PART ONE: Chapter One

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PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:24 pm

riverrun, past Eve and Adam’s, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.

Okay, Riverrun refers to the River Liffey which flows from the Dublin Mountains to Dublin Bay. The river also refers to ALP, the wife of Finnegan and also femininity in general (I think). Adam and Eve’s is a cathedral in the centre of Dublin's, located just beside where the old Viking settlement used to be, and close to the River Liffey.(The vikings founded Dublin over 1,000 years ago). William Tindall companion suggests that the words Adam and Eve are reversed to imply temptation, fall, and renewable.

Vicus refers to Vico, whose recurrent cycle of three ages influenced Joyce and influenced the structure of Finnegan's Wake. Commodius maybe partly refers to Commodus, a Roman emperor, who coincidently was the model for the Joaquin Phoenix Emperor in the movie gladiator. And of course the Phoenix Park in Dublin, resurrection, recirculation (just a coincidence, of course, of course). Here's some information I found about him:
• Comodus
The first years of his reign were uneventful, but in 183 he was attacked by an assassin at the instigation of his sister Lucilla and many members of the senate, which felt deeply insulted by the contemptuous manner in which Commodus treated it. From this time he became tyrannical. Many distinguished Romans were put to death as implicated in the conspiracy, and others were executed for no reason at all. The treasury was exhausted by lavish expenditure on gladiatorial and wild beast combats and on the soldiery, and the property of the wealthy was confiscated. At the same time Commodus, proud of his bodily strength and dexterity, exhibited himself in the arena, slew wild animals and fought with gladiators, and commanded that he should be worshipped as the Roman Hercules. Plots against his life naturally began to spring up. He was poisoned, and then strangled by a wrestler named Narcissus, on the 31st of December 192.
Interesting that he strangled his father, as the theme of son replacing father figure seems to be part of FW, and then died being strangled by NARCISSUS!!!!.
Comodus could also refer to ‘comode’ as chamberpot. Also died on the last day of the year - end of old, start of new?

Howth was located on the north side of Dublin, on the head of land joined to the rest of Dublin by a peninsula. Howth castle is located near there. In truth it's not a very big castle at all, but one of its warrior queens who lived in Howth Castle, whose name I forget, and lived around the time of Elizabeth I in England (early 17th century) is referenced in this book. Howth Castle and Environs has the initials HCE which also refer to HC Earwicker, one of the main characters in the book, who I think is also Finnegan. Howth was also supposed to be one of the favourite resting spots of Finn McCuail and the Fianna, a legendary warrior group. Finn had many magical powers and great wisdom due to eating a magical salmon. Fin is also French for the end. Hmmm
'Recirculation' and the word 'back' is of course one of the many themes in the book, in the sense that the Vico thought that history repeated itself, and evaporation, rain, streams and then rivers are a form of recirculation.


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2nd para

Post  tony smyth on Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:55 pm

Sir Tristram, violer d’amores, fr’over the short sea, had passencore rearrived from North Armorica on this side the scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor to wielderfight his penisolate war: nor had topsawyer’s rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse to Laurens County’s gorgios while they went doublin their mumper all the time: nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to tauftauf thuartpeatrick not yet, though venissoon after, had a kidscad buttended a bland old isaac: not yet, though all’s fair in vanessy, were sosie sesthers wroth with twone nathandjoe. Rot a peck of pa’s malt had Jhem or Shen brewed by arclight and rory end to the regginbrow was to be seen ringsome on the aquaface.
Sir Tristram and personally refers to Tristran and Isolde. (have to investigate this further)
Over the short sea might refer to the Irish Sea.
North Armorica of course can be North America, a country were many young Irish people have emigrated to, and are still doing so now, due to a fucked up economy.
The scraggy isthmus might refer to the narrow neck of land which joins Howth to the main part of Dublin on the northside. That would probably mean Europe Minor also refers to Ireland.
Passencore I think is French for once again. Again the recirculation theme.
penisolate war: obviously penis but also the peninsular Wars which I don't know anything about.
topsawyer: obviously Tom Sawyer, but also according to Tyndall and there is a Dublin in Georgia which was founded by a man named Sawyer on the Oconee River is in Laurens County. The word Laurens could also referred to Laurence O'Toole who I think was a bishop in Dublin at some time.
No idea what the word Mumper means
nor avoice from afire equals a voice from afar
mishe this word means me or myself in Irish
tauftauf is apparently the German for baptise (is from Tyndall)
thuartpeatrick: St Patrick is a national saint of Ireland, brought as a slave from Wales and converted the island to Christianity. Also seems to refer to you are Peter and upon this rock I will build my church (in Catholicism). Also St Patrick's is another church cathedral in Dublin's and Dean Swift was a dean there. Swift is another figure the crops up in Finnegans Wake.
Isaac: googled this; son of Abraham, born when Abraham was 100!!!
At God's command, Abraham was to build a sacrificial altar and sacrifice his son Isaac upon it. After he had bound his son to the altar and drawn his knife to kill him, at the very last moment an angel of God prevented Abraham from proceeding. Rather, he was directed to sacrifice a nearby ram instead. This event served as a test of Abraham's faith in God.
Isaac grew old and became blind. He called his other son Esau and directed him to procure some venison for him, in order to receive Isaac's blessing. While Esau was hunting, Jacob, after listening to his mother's advice, deceived his blind father by misrepresenting himself as Esau and thereby obtained his father's blessing, such that Jacob became Isaac's primary heir and Esau was left in an inferior position.
Some references to this deception later in this chapter.
kidscad buttended a bland old isaac: From Tyndall: reference to Irish politics late 19th century. Parnell, big hero in Irealnd til dumped out of office for an illicit affair, big hero of Joyces I believe. Anyway, when younger he displaced Isaac Butt in parliament as leader of the Home rule Party. Younger replacing father figure. Ah: HOME Rule! just realised, it meant the Irish having their own parliament instaead of rule by London. but in FW couod be related to the home/family/sons replacing father themes (maybe).
Twone is two in one; Reference to the twins who are Finnegans sons?
Jhem or Shen; references Jamesons a famous Irish whiskey, malt maybe to do with Guinness. Can’t make much of the last 3 lines of this paragraph.

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para 3

Post  tony smyth on Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:56 pm

The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonner-ronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur — nuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy. The great fall of the offwall entailed at such short notice the pftjschute of Finnegan, erse solid man, that the humptyhillhead of humself prumptly sends an unquiring one well to the west in quest of his tumptytumtoes: and their upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green since devslinsfirst loved livvy.
The fall
would be fall of Adam, also fall of Finnegan off the ladder.
First of the thunder words, which I think repeat 10 times in the Wake: relation to Vico:

The Viconian cycle consists of three recurring phases: (1) the Theocratic or Divine Age of gods, represented in primitive society by the family life of the cave, to which the voice of God (thunder) has driven mankind.

Not sure here, as I think this part of the book is the lead up to one of the ages, rather than the start of one at this point in the book. Combined thunder word uses words for noise, thunder and shit. Konnbron apparently refers to a French general called Cambronne who when asked to surrender replied merde. I can remember RAW mentioning this story, and also seem to remember it in some World War II based film I saw.
Wallstrait obviously Wall Street, so maybe a reference to the crash of 1928 in the word fall.
retaled can be both retail and also to tell again, to repeat.
parr according to Tyndall is the first stage of a developing salmon. As far as I know there are no salmon in the Liffey now but there might have been in Joyce's day. At any rate the references here to stages of life. Also Finn McCual eating the salmon of wisdom?? Also early in bed and later in life. Old Parr was the nickname of Thomas Parr who lived to be a hundred and 52 years old (Campbell)

humptyhillhead: reference to Humpty Dumpty, all the kings horses and all the king's men couldn't put Humpty Dumpty together again. And Hillhead might refer to Howth head
tumptytumtoes: also kind of rhymes with Humpty. There is also a sort of childishness about the language here. Why a quest for tumptytumtoes?
upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park: knock refers to Castleknock which is an area of Dublin close to Phoenix Park. A pike was a primitive weapon easily manufactured and used in fighting against the British.
where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green: well orange and green probably represent the orange of William of Orange who led the forces that beat her Catholic army at the Battle of the Boyne, and is associated with our Orange men in Northern Ireland. Green is the national colour of Ireland and is associated more with nationalism and republicanism. Also the Irish flag is comprised of green orange and white stripes.
devslinsfirst loved livvy: Dublin and Liffey. Also Devlin is a common Irish name, and could also be connected to Eamon DeValera, who was one of the leaders of the 1916 rising against the British, and only escaped being shot because he had American nationality. He later became the president of Ireland and Irish presidents live in the Phoenix Park.

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Paragraph 4

Post  tony smyth on Wed Feb 13, 2013 12:47 am

What clashes here of wills gen wonts, oystrygods gaggin fishy-gods! Brékkek Kékkek Kékkek Kékkek! Kóax Kóax Kóax! Ualu Ualu Ualu! Quaouauh! Where the Baddelaries partisans are still out to mathmaster Malachus Micgranes and the Verdons cata-pelting the camibalistics out of the Whoyteboyce of Hoodie Head. Assiegates and boomeringstroms. Sod’s brood, be me fear! Sanglorians, save! Arms apeal with larms, appalling. Killykill-killy: a toll, a toll. What chance cuddleys, what cashels aired and ventilated! What bidimetoloves sinduced by what tegotetab-solvers! What true feeling for their’s hayair with what strawng voice of false jiccup! O here here how hoth sprowled met the duskt the father of fornicationists but, (O my shining stars and body!) how hath fanespanned most high heaven the skysign of soft advertisement! But was iz? Iseut? Ere were sewers? The oaks of ald now they lie in peat yet elms leap where askes lay. Phall if you but will, rise you must: and none so soon either shall the pharce for the nunce come to a setdown secular phoenish.
Primitive conflicts
Ostrogoths and Visogoths Germanic tribes around the time of the Romans?
wills gen wonts = will won’t
Brékkek Kékkek Kékkek Kékkek! Kóax Kóax Kóax! Sounds like seagulls, but probably not intended
partisans, cata-pelting, camibalistics = warfare
mathmaster - Campbell has this is math the Anglo-Saxon word from mow or cut Down, and also the Sanskrit or annihilate stop
Verdons = Verdun? Site of bloody battle in World War I
Hoodie Head = may be a reference to Howth Head
Boomeringstroms - boomerangs
Sod’s brood - sod could be the old sod, a reference to whom or Ireland, who could be brood of children Irish tribes?
Sanglorians -Campbell has is down as sang the French government, also Anglo, and also sounds like sanglot French for sob. Glori = glory. In total battle imagery
Arms apeal with larms - arms, weapons, appeal = sound of church bells ringing wartime maybe
Killykill-killy = kill obviously, but also sounds like the name of an Irish town.
a toll, a toll= bells tolling for the dead?, atol is a small island, so maybe a reference to Ireland
Cashels - Cashel is a town in County Tipperary near where I went to school. There is the church and castle built on top of a large prominent Hill, well defended in old times. Tourist spot now

aired and ventilated not sure what he's getting at here
What bidimetoloves sinduced could be a seducer or an affair, and tegotetab-solvers = could be Catholic confession, absolution of sin
hayair with what strawng- hay and straw are basically the same thing, possibly this is a reference to the twins
false jiccup- Tindall thinks this is a reference to Jacob and Isau again
O here here how hoth sprowled met the duskt the father of fornicationists - this is probably a combination of Finnegan's fall and also the shape of Dublin being his body with the head at head. Howth sprowled = Howth
the father of fornicationists also be Adam, the first father
most high heaven the skysign of soft advertisement! But was iz? Iseut? Both of my companions have this down as rainbows and signs of redemption, Iseult
The oaks of ald now they lie in peat yet elms leap where askes lay = in Ireland there is lots of turf, peat created by old forests so long ago. Much of the centre and West of Ireland has peaked bogs. In this sentence seems like an image of things dying, falling into the ground and then being rejuvenated, hence an image of death and rebirth.
Phall if you but will, rise you must- what a brilliant line from Joyce! Obviously there is a sexual element here, but also a reference to the fall and resurrection
the pharce for the nunce come to a setdown secular phoenish:pharce is a farce, may be referring to the whole story is as a farce, or life as a farce. phoenish refers both to the Phoenix, the image of rising from the dead, and finish as in the end of the cycle farao farao

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  Zenjew on Thu Feb 14, 2013 7:12 pm

[quote="tony smyth"]riverrun, past Eve and Adam’s, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.


I think that "Eve and Adam's" is reversed also because Joyce placed such importance on the feminine principle. Joyce always portrayed women as strong characters, and was a major feminist. Women give birth, after all, and are the originators of life, so placing Eve first also contradicts the Bible, something non-believer Joyce surely did with a "nyah nyah" type of attitude. And also we're dealing with a circular structure here, as the "opening" is a continuation of the book's "last" section, which is ALP's monologue. She (as the river Liffey) flows back (returns) to the sea, and we are still not fully into the HCE, or male, element here, at least "not yet, though venissoon after". Note that Ulysses also ends with Molly's monologue.

Excellent notes, Tony! I've been sick, but will try to keep up with your pace, offering a comment or two here and there.

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Thu Feb 14, 2013 8:55 pm

Hiya. All good points. There are so many ways you can read this, which I suppose is part of the fun of it. I come from Dublin, and though I had read that opening line before, my mind had automatically rearranged it to Adam and Eves'. Amzing how Nora, though being this uncultured teenager from the West of Ireland when he met her, and though she never read any of his books, had such a strong influence on JJ's life and writing.

I have photos I took in Dublin, including 2 of the hotel that she used to work at (FINNS HOTEL!!) . Any way to post them on this site?

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  Zenjew on Thu Feb 14, 2013 10:39 pm

Found this in the FAQ: Images can indeed be shown in your posts. However, there is no facility at present for uploading images directly to this board. Therefore you must link to an image stored on a publicly accessible web server, e.g. http://www.some-unknown-place.net/my-picture.gif. You cannot link to pictures stored on your own PC (unless it is a publicly accessible server) nor to images stored behind authentication mechanisms such as Hotmail or Yahoo mailboxes, password-protected sites, etc. To display the image use either the BBCode [img] tag or appropriate HTML (if allowed).

As for Nora, I think her and JJ's relationship is really one for the ages. Not only did she inspire him in all of her "ordinariness," but we probably wouldn't have Ulysses and FW without her -- though she thought Joyce should have been a singer and wished that he didn't spend all of his time writing his "silly" books, she was very patient with him, and obviously supported his artistic vision and Bohemian lifestyle. And, of course, it was the handjob she gave Joyce on June 16, 1904, that inspired him to pick that date for Ulysses. It was the first time they had "sex," if you can call it that. And it was Nora who said, "What's all this talk about Ulysses? Finnegans Wake is the important book."

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Para 5

Post  tony smyth on Mon Feb 18, 2013 12:47 am

FW Para 5
Part 1: Bygmester Finnegan, of the Stuttering Hand, freemen’s maurer, lived in the broadest way immarginable in his rushlit toofar — back for messuages before joshuan judges had given us numbers or Helviticus committed deuteronomy (one yeastyday he sternely struxk his tete in a tub for to watsch the future of his fates but ere he swiftly stook it out again, by the might of moses, the very water was eviparated and all the guenneses had met their exodus so that ought to show you what a pentschanjeuchy chap he was!) and during mighty odd years this man of hod, cement and edifices in Toper’s Thorp piled buildung supra buildung pon the banks for the livers by the Soangso.

Lots of reference to Finnegan as builder, and to Moses and Old Testament. According to Tyndall this paragraph concerns creation- the making of towers, love and books.
Bymester – master builder in Danish via Ibsen (JJ was big Ibsen fan)
a primitive "maurer" (German mason)
Freemens maurer - The Freeman's Journal was the oldest nationalist newspaper in Ireland. It was founded in 1763 and was Charles Stewart Parnell's biggest supporter. Parnell was brought down by a scandal (affair with another guys wife).
Joshua became the leader of the Israelite tribes after the death of Moses
Helveticus: (Latin) Swiss → Ulysses was largely written in Switzerland
deuteronomy speeches delivered to the Israelites by Moses on the plains of Moab, shortly before they enter the Promised Land
Yeast – rises, one of the themes of FW
sternely struxk his tete in a tub for to watsch the future of his fates but ere he swiftly stook it out again – Swift and Sterne (only know this because I re-read first chapter of Coincidance,
the very water was eviparated and all the guenneses had met their exodus: - Moses parting the Red Sea and the Exodus from Egypt
pentschanjeuchy: Pentateuch: the first five books of Jewish and Christian Scriptures
hod, cement and edifices = hce
piled buildung supra buildung pon the banks for the livers = Finnegan building on the banks of the Liffey?
Soangso.- so and so (wherever) , substitute for a name not exactly remembered.

Part 2: He addle liddle phifie Annie ugged the little craythur. Wither hayre in honds tuck up your part inher. Oftwhile balbulous, mithre ahead, with goodly trowel in grasp and ivoroiled overalls which he habitacularly fondseed, like Haroun Childeric Eggeberth he would caligulate by multiplicables the alltitude and malltitude until he seesaw by neatlight of the liquor wheretwin ’twas born, his roundhead staple of other days to rise in undress maisonry upstanded (joygrantit!), a waalworth of a skyerscape of most eyeful hoyth entowerly, erigenating from next to nothing and celescalating the himals and all, hierarchitectitiptitoploftical, with a burning bush abob off its baubletop and with larrons o’toolers clittering up and tombles a’buckets clottering down.

He addle liddle phifie Annie ugged the little craythur
- name Annie as Finnegans wife, ALP, very childish language, very Irish in the little craythur, (would be pronounced cray-chur in the west of Ireland)
Wither hayre in honds – hare and hounds (twins reference?)
tuck up your part inher. – sex
Hierarchitectitiptitoploftical – levels, bulding, levels, top
larrons o’toolers – Lawrence O’Toole was Dublin's archbishop from 1162 to 1180 and gained a reputation as a skillful mediator between rival Gaelic and Norman factions then fighting for power in Ireland. First native Irish Archbishop
balbulous – from Finnegans Wiki: balbus: (Latin) stammering → in FW HCE's stammer is indicative of his guilt. balbulus: (Latin) stammering, stuttering. bibulous: addicted to strong drink. Fabulous. Balbus: a Roman who built a wall → A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ch 1: "And behind the door of one of the closets there was a drawing in red pencil of a bearded man in a Roman dress with a brick in each hand and underneath was the name of the drawing: Balbus was building a wall." → Cicero, Letters to Atticus XII: [amazing how much Joyce has condensed into one word!!)
mithre – mitre/miter, religiouos staff held by a bishop.
Trowel/ overalls – Finnegans job as maker of walls
habitacularly fondseed – habit, habit and fond of, seed suggest sex
H. C. E. Childers - celebrated 19th Century British politician and statesman. Towards the end of his ministerial career he was noted for his girth, and so acquired the nickname "Here Comes Everybody".
Caligulate by multiplicables - Caligula , lunatic roman emperor, calculate, multiplication tables
the alltitude and malltitude – kind of has a feel of kid learning math by rote, also altitude, Finnegan falls off wall
seesaw by neatlight of the liquor wheretwin ’twas born- seesaw = backwards and forwards, wheretwin = the twins
Roundhead – this is reference to the helmets Cromwell’s troop wore. Invaded Ireland and killed any native/Catholic resistance. Protestant Vs Catholic. Native VS invader. Twins duelling,
undress maisonry upstanded – Finnegans wall, sexual imagery
a waalworth of a skyerscape of most eyeful hoyth entowerly _ Woolworth, skyscrapers/towers, tower of Howth Castle
erigenating – origin, start of fable, Adam and Eve?
burning bush – the location at which Moses was appointed by God to lead the Israelites out of Egypt and into Canaan.
its baubletop – Tower of Babel, top of the wall,
clittering up and tombles a’buckets clottering down. Building the wall, Finnegan falling down


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para6

Post  tony smyth on Wed Feb 20, 2013 2:15 am

Of the first was he to bare arms and a name: Wassaily Booslaeugh of Riesengeborg. His crest of huroldry, in vert with ancillars, troublant, argent, a hegoak, poursuivant, horrid, horned. His scutschum fessed, with archers strung, helio, of the second. Hootch is for husbandman handling his hoe. Hohohoho, Mister Finn, you’re going to be Mister Finnagain! Comeday morm and, O, you’re vine! Sendday’s eve and, ah, you’re vinegar! Hahahaha, Mister Funn, you’re going to be fined again!
Warriors, heraldry, rise/rebirth, sense of a cycle happening
Wassaily Booslaeugh of Riesengeborg can’t make much of this other than the German final name
Argent, horned – suggest sexual erection and also building (the two seem combined a lot in FW), plus also heraldry terms
scutschum fessed – confessed?
Hootch – slang for cheap alcohol
Handling his hoe – masturbation and also building
Hohohoho, Mister Finn, you’re going to be Mister Finnagain- the cycle/ the rise
Comeday morm and, O, you’re vine – asleep, fine in the morning,
Vine, – wine
Vinegar – wine gone off, past its best

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:16 am

FW Para 7
Part 1
What then agentlike brought about that tragoady thundersday this municipal sin business? Our cubehouse still rocks as earwitness to the thunder of his arafatas but we hear also through successive ages that shebby choruysh of unkalified muzzlenimiissilehims that would blackguardise the whitestone ever hurtleturtled out of heaven. Stay us wherefore in our search for tighteousness, O Sustainer, what time we rise and when we take up to toothmick and before we lump down upown our leatherbed and in the night and at the fading of the stars! For a nod to the nabir is better than wink to the wabsanti. Otherways wesways like that provost scoffing bedoueen the jebel and the jpysian sea. Cropherb the crunch-bracken shall decide. Then we’ll know if the feast is a flyday. She has a gift of seek on site and she allcasually ansars helpers, the dreamydeary.
Thundersday = Thursday (day of Finnegans tragic death)
municipal sin – original sin
muzzlenimiissilehims – Arabic words combined
blackguardise - blackguard is a bad person in Ireland ( my Dad used to use this word) . Always pronounced “blaggard”, this is a word used primarily by the older Irish generation. It’s also used as a verb to indicate someone’s behaviour: “He’s only blaggardin’ ya”. The origins of this word have been lost to time, but the OED dates it back to the 15th century. It is thought to refer either to the colour of someone’s soul (black) or perhaps the colour worn by the stern, elite guards of the King.
Stay us wherefore in our search for tighteousness, O Sustainer: sort of based on a catholic prayer. (help us in our search for righteousness, o lord?)
For a nod to the nabir is better than wink to the wabsanti. Same rhythm as ‘a bird in the bush is worth two in the hand’. Nabi is the Arabic name for a prophet. In the Qur’an there were twenty-five prophets, Muhammad being the last one. The nadir is the lowest point of someone’s misfortune. Absent + santi is Italian for saint.
bedoueen the jebel and the jpysian sea. "Between the devil and the deep blue sea" is an idiom meaning a dilemma—i.e., to choose between two undesirable situations (equivalent to "between a rock and a hard place"). Also Egyptian sea – Moses parting Red Sea?
Cropherb – prophet?, proverb,
Then we’ll know if the feast is a flyday. According to Campbell, this is a key theme of FW: in a communion feast the substance of All-father is served by all-Mother to the universal company. Also references Catholic mass in which body of Christ is symbolically consumed. So death Thursday, feast Friday
she allcasually ansars helpers, the dreamydeary. – maybe ALP type language here.

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Mon Feb 25, 2013 8:28 am

Para 7 pt2
Finnegans fall from the wall
Heed! Heed! It may half been a missfired brick, as some say, or it mought have been due to a collupsus of his back promises, as others looked at it. (There extand by now one thousand and one stories, all told, of the same). But so sore did abe ite ivvy’s holired abbles, (what with the wallhall’s horrors of rolls-rights, carhacks, stonengens, kisstvanes, tramtrees, fargobawlers, autokinotons, hippohobbilies, streetfleets, tournintaxes, mega-phoggs, circuses and wardsmoats and basilikerks and aeropagods and the hoyse and the jollybrool and one thousand and one stories and the mecklenburk bitch bite at his ear and the merlinburrow burrocks and his fore old porecourts, the bore the more, and his blightblack workingstacks at twelvepins a dozen and the noobi-busses sleighding along Safetyfirst Street and the derryjellybies snooping around Tell–No-Tailors’ Corner and the fumes and the hopes and the strupithump of his ville’s indigenous romekeepers, homesweepers, domecreepers, thurum and thurum in fancymud murumd and all the uproor from all the aufroofs, a roof for may and a reef for hugh butt under his bridge suits tony) wan warning Phill filt tippling full. His howd feeled heavy, his hoddit did shake. (There was a wall of course in erection) Dimb! He stot-tered from the latter. Damb! he was dud. Dumb! Mastabatoom, mastabadtomm, when a mon merries his lute is all long. For whole the world to see.

one thousand and one stories: the thousand and one nights; Middle eastern imagery
abe ite ivvy’s holired abbles- Liffey, Eve, red apples, Abraham? , the AB combination that RAW mentions in Coincidance, Eve tempting Adam in the Garden of Eden
The whole section in brackets: imagery of people, automation, life in Dublin, but also the far east – pagods,
[i]stonengens, kisstvanes:
kistvaen: a box-shaped or boat-shaped tomb from the Stone Age (from the Welsh cist, "chest", and maen, "stone") → this paragraph corresponds to Vico's third age, which is characterized by the institution of burial ( from FW Wiki) also stonehenge, stone age. (burial references)
Basilikerks, romekeepers: Basilicas, priests
fore old porecourts [/i]– the poor old Four Courts, actual building so named, where there are 4 courts. Its on the Liffey.
noobi-busses sleighding along Safetyfirst Street: suggests maybe horse drawn trams going along Sackville St, now called O’Connell St, biggest st in Dublin.
thurum and thurum in fancymud murumd and all the uproor from all the aufroofs –sounds of the city
roof for may and a reef for hugh butt under his bridge suits tony - Butt bridge crosses the Liffey. Couldnt find anything for May hugh = Mayhew a surname .
Mastabatoom, mastabadtomm Egyptian stone mummy for the dead, plus sound effect like the thunder sound as Finnegan falls off the ladder

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Tue Feb 26, 2013 7:35 am

FW para 8
Shize? I should shee! Macool, Macool, orra whyi deed ye diie? of a trying thirstay mournin? Sobs they sighdid at Fillagain’s chrissormiss wake, all the hoolivans of the nation, prostrated in their consternation and their duodisimally profusive plethora of ululation. There was plumbs and grumes and cheriffs and citherers and raiders and cinemen too. And the all gianed in with the shout-most shoviality. Agog and magog and the round of them agrog. To the continuation of that celebration until Hanandhunigan’s extermination! Some in kinkin corass, more, kankan keening. Belling him up and filling him down. He’s stiff but he’s steady is Priam Olim! ’Twas he was the dacent gaylabouring youth. Sharpen his pillowscone, tap up his bier! E’erawhere in this whorl would ye hear sich a din again? With their deepbrow fundigs and the dusty fidelios. They laid him brawdawn alanglast bed. With a bockalips of finisky fore his feet. And a barrowload of guenesis hoer his head. Tee the tootal of the fluid hang the twoddle of the fuddled, O!
Shize: isn’t this like the German name for shit? Not sure how spelled. Also shize looks like it might be Hebrew. Anyone?
Macool, Macool,:Now he is FinnMcCool,
orra whyi deed ye diie? Very Irish, exactly how it would be said in the West of Ireland
of a trying thirstay mournin: dry and thirsty morning. Think this relates to song lyrics
According to Tindall all the words ending in –tion are the 12 mourners.
Agrog drunken
Some in kinkin corass, more, kankan keening. Belling him up and filling him down: singing in chorus, crying, praising and criticising him
continuation ... celebration ...extermination: Latinisms, associated with The Twelve mourners/jurors(Wiki)

Priam Olim: amazing how much Joyce fits into this name, if the wiki is to be believed.
• Priam: the king of Troy during the Trojan War
• Brian O'Linn: (song) Irish song with innumerable verses about a man who always sees the bright side of a difficult situation → the Four Old Men's four comments in this paragraph are in the rhythm of Brian O'Linn
• prius: (Latin) before
• olim: (Latin) once
• Priapus: a Greek god of fertility whose attribute was the phallus → stiff
Sharpen his pillowscone, tap up his bier : Scone: a place in Scotland; the Stone of Scone was supposedly the Lia Fáil, or Stone of Destiny, a monolith taken from Tara which roared its approbation when the true High King of Ireland was crowned; it is now the Coronation Stone in Westminster Abbey. Also pillow stone, pillar stone.
E’erawhere in this whorl would ye hear sich a din again? Noise at the wake, where in the world would you here such a thing again? Very Irish expression, maybe in lyrics of the time?
the dusty fidelios: adeste fideles- latin hymn still sung these days. Same tune as Oh come all ye faithful.
With a bockalips of finisky fore his feet. And a barrowload of guenesis hoer his head.Whiskey at his feet, Guiness at his head
Tee the tootal of the fluid hang the twoddle of the fuddled, O! Joyce having fun here: teetotal never drinks alcohol. Fuddled suggests drunkenness. Also, this a is a play on an old Irish song called Phil the fluters ball. Original like this, note the O! at the end is the same :

With the (G)toot of the flute, And the (C)twiddle of the (G)fiddle, O;
Hopping in the middle, like a herrin' on the (D)griddle, O.
(G)Up! down, hands aroun', (C)crossin' to the (G)wall
Oh!, hadn't we the gaiety at (C)Phil the (D)fluther's (G)ball cyclops cyclops

Once you work out what Joyce is doing in this paragraph its actually very funny. Gets rid of the idea that The Wake is just some very heavy obscure literary book. I'd imagine he had a lot of fun writing this part.


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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Fri Mar 01, 2013 9:45 am

FW Para 9
Hurrah, there is but young gleve for the owl globe wheels in view which is tautaulogically the same thing. Well, Him a being so on the flounder of his bulk like an overgrown babeling, let wee peep, see, at Hom, well, see peegee ought he ought, platterplate. Hum! From Shopalist to Bailywick or from ashtun to baronoath or from Buythebanks to Roundthehead or from the foot of the bill to ireglint’s eye he calmly extensolies. And all the way (a horn!) from fiord to fjell his baywinds’ oboboes shall wail him rockbound (hoahoahoah!) in swimswamswum and all the livvy-long night, the delldale dalppling night, the night of bluerybells, her flittaflute in tricky trochees (O carina! O carina!) wake him. With her issavan essavans and her patterjackmartins about all them inns and ouses. Tilling a teel of a tum, telling a toll of a tea-ry turty Taubling. Grace before Glutton. For what we are, gifs a gross if we are, about to believe. So pool the begg and pass the kish for crawsake. Omen. So sigh us. Grampupus is fallen down but grinny sprids the boord. Whase on the joint of a desh? Fin-foefom the Fush. Whase be his baken head? A loaf of Singpan — try’s Kennedy bread. And whase hitched to the hop in his tayle? A glass of Danu U’Dunnell’s foamous olde Dobbelin ayle. But, lo, as you would quaffoff his fraudstuff and sink teeth through that pyth of a flowerwhite bodey behold of him as behemoth for he is noewhemoe. Finiche! Only a fadograph of a yestern scene. Almost rubicund Salmosalar, ancient fromout the ages of the Ag-apemonides, he is smolten in our mist, woebecanned and packt away. So that meal’s dead off for summan, schlook, schlice and goodridhirring.

Him a being so on the flounder of his bulk like an overgrown babeling: He’s lying down like an overgown child
let wee peep, see, at Hom: lets look at Finnegans bulk lying down.
Shopalist to Bailywick or from ashtun to baronoath or from Buythebanks to Roundthehead or from the foot of the bill to ireglint’s eye he calmly extensolies.: Finnegan as giant lies across Dublin.,Various place names mentioned: he calmly extensolies = HCE Earwicker/ Finnegan
Bailywick; Bailey Lighthouse: a lighthouse on Howth Head (F’s head), marks the nothernmost part of Dublin Bay
Shopalist: Chapelizod (F’s feet), near the Phoenix Park
ireglint’s eye = Irelands Eye, a small unoccupied island off Howth. The Baily Lighthouse faces towards Dublin Bay, probably the northernmost lighthouse. Ireland's Eye is on the other side of Howth head. Its clearly visible from the harbour. The Joyces lived for short time in a house above one end of the harbour. CAn still see the house today.
Ashtun Ashtown a village north of Dublin
Baranoath: barr an: (Irish) the top of the... The top of Howth . Howth is Finnegans head. Baron of Howth: A title in the Anglo-Irish Peerage held in the St. Lawrence family which existed from around 1625 to 1801, at which time it was elevated to an earldom. The family seat was at Howth Castle. (this from FW Wiki)
in swimswamswum and all the livvy-long night, the delldale dalppling night, the night of bluerybells, her flittaflute in tricky trochees (O carina! O carina!) wake him.: female watery ALP language and sounds
tea-ry turty Taubling. Dear Dirty Dublin. “Taubelin” German for “little dove.”
Grace before Glutton. For what we are, gifs a gross if we are, about to believe. So pool the begg and pass the kish for crawsake. Omen. So sigh us. A group gather round the giant to symbolically eat him. According to Campbell a key theme of the Wake – a communion feats in which the substance of all-father is served by all-mother to the universal company. Related to Catholic mass in which the body of Christ is symbolically eaten. [Grace before meals. For what we are about to receive. Amen . so say us]
pool the begg and pass the kish for crawsake. PoolBeg and The Kish are lighthouses somewhere of the east coast. Mentioned in daily weather reports
Grampupus is fallen down but grinny sprids the boord. Grandfather grandmother. Finnegan being ritually prepared for eating.
Fin-foefom the Fush.- kids song – fee, fie, foe fomb, I smell the blood of an English-man.
A loaf of Singpan — try’s Kennedy bread. Kenedys bread , the company still in business after all this time (awful bread though!)
A glass of Danu U’Dunnell’s foamous olde Dobbelin ayle. But, lo, as you would quaffoff his fraudstuff and sink teeth through that pyth of a flowerwhite bodey behold of him as behemoth for he is noewhemoe. – getting ready to eaty and drink, including eating his giant white body, but suddenly he is gone.
Finiche! Only a fadograph of a yestern scene. Faded, photograph, yesterday, western
Salmosalar: Salmo salar: the Atlantic salmon (both words being related to the Latin salire, "to leap") → in FW HCE is identified not only with Finn MacCool but also with the Salmon of Knowledge which Finn eats → the life-cycle of the salmon, as salmon go back to their place of origin to die ( this tale of Finn eating the salmon and gaining wisdom from this magic fish is well known in Ireland). Salmanazar: a large-sized wine bottle (from FW Wiki)
Ag-apemonides: Agape: a love feast (Greek: agape, love); the early Christians held a love-feast in conjunction with the Lord's Supper when the rich provided food for the poor. agapemone: a free-love institution. Also mouth agape (wide open)
smolten in our mist, woebecanned and packt away.; Smolt is an early stage in a salmons life cycle, also have cycle of going from river to sea and then returning to spawn. Canned salmon?
schlook, schlice and goodridhirring: red herring, false lead. Good riddance.


Last edited by tony smyth on Sun Mar 03, 2013 9:59 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Salmon of knowledge?

Post  fly agaric on Sun Mar 03, 2013 7:50 pm

Wow Tony, your really doing it. Great work.

To jump in right here...i would like to add this quote from Peter Lamborn Wilson (Irish Soma) that gives us a good lens for trawling the Wake, and a focus on SALMON. On the look out for elixirs, magic brews and to uncover psychoactive compounds. Joyce's 'nat language' itself acts like a psychoactive compound, i think.

"The Irish material abounds in references to magical substances which bestow knowledge and/or pleasure when ingested. Perhaps the best-known are the hazelnuts of wisdom, eaten by the Salmon, fished up by the Druid, and cooked by young Finn--who, as "sorcerer's apprentice", burns his thumb on the Salmon's skin, sticks thumb in mouth, and attains all the wisdom in his master's stead. The "shamanic" overtones of this story are quite obvious.--Peter Lamborn Wilson, Irish Soma.

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Sun Mar 03, 2013 9:53 pm

Yep, thats the one. Got to know that story as a kid. Not sure if its still taught in schools, but probably. Also the druid had been trying to catch that salmon all his life. Then, having finally caught it, the young kid who is cooking it for him touches the skin, burns his finger, then puts the finger in his mouth and ingests the salmons wisdom (as it were). Also fits with the Wake theme of the young son in competition with the father figure. There's a statue of Cuchulain dying in the GPO in Dublin - site of the HQ of Irish resistance in the 1916 Rising. (and it is said as the RISING in Dublin!!!) Cant remember if Cuchulain and FinnMcCool are the same person. Must check that out.

Anyway feel free to contribute. Dont want to do this whole book on my own. albino albino

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