PART ONE: Chapter One

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PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:24 am

riverrun, past Eve and Adam’s, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.

Okay, Riverrun refers to the River Liffey which flows from the Dublin Mountains to Dublin Bay. The river also refers to ALP, the wife of Finnegan and also femininity in general (I think). Adam and Eve’s is a cathedral in the centre of Dublin's, located just beside where the old Viking settlement used to be, and close to the River Liffey.(The vikings founded Dublin over 1,000 years ago). William Tindall companion suggests that the words Adam and Eve are reversed to imply temptation, fall, and renewable.

Vicus refers to Vico, whose recurrent cycle of three ages influenced Joyce and influenced the structure of Finnegan's Wake. Commodius maybe partly refers to Commodus, a Roman emperor, who coincidently was the model for the Joaquin Phoenix Emperor in the movie gladiator. And of course the Phoenix Park in Dublin, resurrection, recirculation (just a coincidence, of course, of course). Here's some information I found about him:
• Comodus
The first years of his reign were uneventful, but in 183 he was attacked by an assassin at the instigation of his sister Lucilla and many members of the senate, which felt deeply insulted by the contemptuous manner in which Commodus treated it. From this time he became tyrannical. Many distinguished Romans were put to death as implicated in the conspiracy, and others were executed for no reason at all. The treasury was exhausted by lavish expenditure on gladiatorial and wild beast combats and on the soldiery, and the property of the wealthy was confiscated. At the same time Commodus, proud of his bodily strength and dexterity, exhibited himself in the arena, slew wild animals and fought with gladiators, and commanded that he should be worshipped as the Roman Hercules. Plots against his life naturally began to spring up. He was poisoned, and then strangled by a wrestler named Narcissus, on the 31st of December 192.
Interesting that he strangled his father, as the theme of son replacing father figure seems to be part of FW, and then died being strangled by NARCISSUS!!!!.
Comodus could also refer to ‘comode’ as chamberpot. Also died on the last day of the year - end of old, start of new?

Howth was located on the north side of Dublin, on the head of land joined to the rest of Dublin by a peninsula. Howth castle is located near there. In truth it's not a very big castle at all, but one of its warrior queens who lived in Howth Castle, whose name I forget, and lived around the time of Elizabeth I in England (early 17th century) is referenced in this book. Howth Castle and Environs has the initials HCE which also refer to HC Earwicker, one of the main characters in the book, who I think is also Finnegan. Howth was also supposed to be one of the favourite resting spots of Finn McCuail and the Fianna, a legendary warrior group. Finn had many magical powers and great wisdom due to eating a magical salmon. Fin is also French for the end. Hmmm
'Recirculation' and the word 'back' is of course one of the many themes in the book, in the sense that the Vico thought that history repeated itself, and evaporation, rain, streams and then rivers are a form of recirculation.


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2nd para

Post  tony smyth on Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:55 am

Sir Tristram, violer d’amores, fr’over the short sea, had passencore rearrived from North Armorica on this side the scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor to wielderfight his penisolate war: nor had topsawyer’s rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse to Laurens County’s gorgios while they went doublin their mumper all the time: nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to tauftauf thuartpeatrick not yet, though venissoon after, had a kidscad buttended a bland old isaac: not yet, though all’s fair in vanessy, were sosie sesthers wroth with twone nathandjoe. Rot a peck of pa’s malt had Jhem or Shen brewed by arclight and rory end to the regginbrow was to be seen ringsome on the aquaface.
Sir Tristram and personally refers to Tristran and Isolde. (have to investigate this further)
Over the short sea might refer to the Irish Sea.
North Armorica of course can be North America, a country were many young Irish people have emigrated to, and are still doing so now, due to a fucked up economy.
The scraggy isthmus might refer to the narrow neck of land which joins Howth to the main part of Dublin on the northside. That would probably mean Europe Minor also refers to Ireland.
Passencore I think is French for once again. Again the recirculation theme.
penisolate war: obviously penis but also the peninsular Wars which I don't know anything about.
topsawyer: obviously Tom Sawyer, but also according to Tyndall and there is a Dublin in Georgia which was founded by a man named Sawyer on the Oconee River is in Laurens County. The word Laurens could also referred to Laurence O'Toole who I think was a bishop in Dublin at some time.
No idea what the word Mumper means
nor avoice from afire equals a voice from afar
mishe this word means me or myself in Irish
tauftauf is apparently the German for baptise (is from Tyndall)
thuartpeatrick: St Patrick is a national saint of Ireland, brought as a slave from Wales and converted the island to Christianity. Also seems to refer to you are Peter and upon this rock I will build my church (in Catholicism). Also St Patrick's is another church cathedral in Dublin's and Dean Swift was a dean there. Swift is another figure the crops up in Finnegans Wake.
Isaac: googled this; son of Abraham, born when Abraham was 100!!!
At God's command, Abraham was to build a sacrificial altar and sacrifice his son Isaac upon it. After he had bound his son to the altar and drawn his knife to kill him, at the very last moment an angel of God prevented Abraham from proceeding. Rather, he was directed to sacrifice a nearby ram instead. This event served as a test of Abraham's faith in God.
Isaac grew old and became blind. He called his other son Esau and directed him to procure some venison for him, in order to receive Isaac's blessing. While Esau was hunting, Jacob, after listening to his mother's advice, deceived his blind father by misrepresenting himself as Esau and thereby obtained his father's blessing, such that Jacob became Isaac's primary heir and Esau was left in an inferior position.
Some references to this deception later in this chapter.
kidscad buttended a bland old isaac: From Tyndall: reference to Irish politics late 19th century. Parnell, big hero in Irealnd til dumped out of office for an illicit affair, big hero of Joyces I believe. Anyway, when younger he displaced Isaac Butt in parliament as leader of the Home rule Party. Younger replacing father figure. Ah: HOME Rule! just realised, it meant the Irish having their own parliament instaead of rule by London. but in FW couod be related to the home/family/sons replacing father themes (maybe).
Twone is two in one; Reference to the twins who are Finnegans sons?
Jhem or Shen; references Jamesons a famous Irish whiskey, malt maybe to do with Guinness. Can’t make much of the last 3 lines of this paragraph.

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para 3

Post  tony smyth on Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:56 pm

The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonner-ronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur — nuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy. The great fall of the offwall entailed at such short notice the pftjschute of Finnegan, erse solid man, that the humptyhillhead of humself prumptly sends an unquiring one well to the west in quest of his tumptytumtoes: and their upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green since devslinsfirst loved livvy.
The fall
would be fall of Adam, also fall of Finnegan off the ladder.
First of the thunder words, which I think repeat 10 times in the Wake: relation to Vico:

The Viconian cycle consists of three recurring phases: (1) the Theocratic or Divine Age of gods, represented in primitive society by the family life of the cave, to which the voice of God (thunder) has driven mankind.

Not sure here, as I think this part of the book is the lead up to one of the ages, rather than the start of one at this point in the book. Combined thunder word uses words for noise, thunder and shit. Konnbron apparently refers to a French general called Cambronne who when asked to surrender replied merde. I can remember RAW mentioning this story, and also seem to remember it in some World War II based film I saw.
Wallstrait obviously Wall Street, so maybe a reference to the crash of 1928 in the word fall.
retaled can be both retail and also to tell again, to repeat.
parr according to Tyndall is the first stage of a developing salmon. As far as I know there are no salmon in the Liffey now but there might have been in Joyce's day. At any rate the references here to stages of life. Also Finn McCual eating the salmon of wisdom?? Also early in bed and later in life. Old Parr was the nickname of Thomas Parr who lived to be a hundred and 52 years old (Campbell)

humptyhillhead: reference to Humpty Dumpty, all the kings horses and all the king's men couldn't put Humpty Dumpty together again. And Hillhead might refer to Howth head
tumptytumtoes: also kind of rhymes with Humpty. There is also a sort of childishness about the language here. Why a quest for tumptytumtoes?
upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park: knock refers to Castleknock which is an area of Dublin close to Phoenix Park. A pike was a primitive weapon easily manufactured and used in fighting against the British.
where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green: well orange and green probably represent the orange of William of Orange who led the forces that beat her Catholic army at the Battle of the Boyne, and is associated with our Orange men in Northern Ireland. Green is the national colour of Ireland and is associated more with nationalism and republicanism. Also the Irish flag is comprised of green orange and white stripes.
devslinsfirst loved livvy: Dublin and Liffey. Also Devlin is a common Irish name, and could also be connected to Eamon DeValera, who was one of the leaders of the 1916 rising against the British, and only escaped being shot because he had American nationality. He later became the president of Ireland and Irish presidents live in the Phoenix Park.

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Paragraph 4

Post  tony smyth on Wed Feb 13, 2013 2:47 am

What clashes here of wills gen wonts, oystrygods gaggin fishy-gods! Brékkek Kékkek Kékkek Kékkek! Kóax Kóax Kóax! Ualu Ualu Ualu! Quaouauh! Where the Baddelaries partisans are still out to mathmaster Malachus Micgranes and the Verdons cata-pelting the camibalistics out of the Whoyteboyce of Hoodie Head. Assiegates and boomeringstroms. Sod’s brood, be me fear! Sanglorians, save! Arms apeal with larms, appalling. Killykill-killy: a toll, a toll. What chance cuddleys, what cashels aired and ventilated! What bidimetoloves sinduced by what tegotetab-solvers! What true feeling for their’s hayair with what strawng voice of false jiccup! O here here how hoth sprowled met the duskt the father of fornicationists but, (O my shining stars and body!) how hath fanespanned most high heaven the skysign of soft advertisement! But was iz? Iseut? Ere were sewers? The oaks of ald now they lie in peat yet elms leap where askes lay. Phall if you but will, rise you must: and none so soon either shall the pharce for the nunce come to a setdown secular phoenish.
Primitive conflicts
Ostrogoths and Visogoths Germanic tribes around the time of the Romans?
wills gen wonts = will won’t
Brékkek Kékkek Kékkek Kékkek! Kóax Kóax Kóax! Sounds like seagulls, but probably not intended
partisans, cata-pelting, camibalistics = warfare
mathmaster - Campbell has this is math the Anglo-Saxon word from mow or cut Down, and also the Sanskrit or annihilate stop
Verdons = Verdun? Site of bloody battle in World War I
Hoodie Head = may be a reference to Howth Head
Boomeringstroms - boomerangs
Sod’s brood - sod could be the old sod, a reference to whom or Ireland, who could be brood of children Irish tribes?
Sanglorians -Campbell has is down as sang the French government, also Anglo, and also sounds like sanglot French for sob. Glori = glory. In total battle imagery
Arms apeal with larms - arms, weapons, appeal = sound of church bells ringing wartime maybe
Killykill-killy = kill obviously, but also sounds like the name of an Irish town.
a toll, a toll= bells tolling for the dead?, atol is a small island, so maybe a reference to Ireland
Cashels - Cashel is a town in County Tipperary near where I went to school. There is the church and castle built on top of a large prominent Hill, well defended in old times. Tourist spot now

aired and ventilated not sure what he's getting at here
What bidimetoloves sinduced could be a seducer or an affair, and tegotetab-solvers = could be Catholic confession, absolution of sin
hayair with what strawng- hay and straw are basically the same thing, possibly this is a reference to the twins
false jiccup- Tindall thinks this is a reference to Jacob and Isau again
O here here how hoth sprowled met the duskt the father of fornicationists - this is probably a combination of Finnegan's fall and also the shape of Dublin being his body with the head at head. Howth sprowled = Howth
the father of fornicationists also be Adam, the first father
most high heaven the skysign of soft advertisement! But was iz? Iseut? Both of my companions have this down as rainbows and signs of redemption, Iseult
The oaks of ald now they lie in peat yet elms leap where askes lay = in Ireland there is lots of turf, peat created by old forests so long ago. Much of the centre and West of Ireland has peaked bogs. In this sentence seems like an image of things dying, falling into the ground and then being rejuvenated, hence an image of death and rebirth.
Phall if you but will, rise you must- what a brilliant line from Joyce! Obviously there is a sexual element here, but also a reference to the fall and resurrection
the pharce for the nunce come to a setdown secular phoenish:pharce is a farce, may be referring to the whole story is as a farce, or life as a farce. phoenish refers both to the Phoenix, the image of rising from the dead, and finish as in the end of the cycle farao farao

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  Zenjew on Thu Feb 14, 2013 9:12 pm

[quote="tony smyth"]riverrun, past Eve and Adam’s, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.


I think that "Eve and Adam's" is reversed also because Joyce placed such importance on the feminine principle. Joyce always portrayed women as strong characters, and was a major feminist. Women give birth, after all, and are the originators of life, so placing Eve first also contradicts the Bible, something non-believer Joyce surely did with a "nyah nyah" type of attitude. And also we're dealing with a circular structure here, as the "opening" is a continuation of the book's "last" section, which is ALP's monologue. She (as the river Liffey) flows back (returns) to the sea, and we are still not fully into the HCE, or male, element here, at least "not yet, though venissoon after". Note that Ulysses also ends with Molly's monologue.

Excellent notes, Tony! I've been sick, but will try to keep up with your pace, offering a comment or two here and there.

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Thu Feb 14, 2013 10:55 pm

Hiya. All good points. There are so many ways you can read this, which I suppose is part of the fun of it. I come from Dublin, and though I had read that opening line before, my mind had automatically rearranged it to Adam and Eves'. Amzing how Nora, though being this uncultured teenager from the West of Ireland when he met her, and though she never read any of his books, had such a strong influence on JJ's life and writing.

I have photos I took in Dublin, including 2 of the hotel that she used to work at (FINNS HOTEL!!) . Any way to post them on this site?

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  Zenjew on Fri Feb 15, 2013 12:39 am

Found this in the FAQ: Images can indeed be shown in your posts. However, there is no facility at present for uploading images directly to this board. Therefore you must link to an image stored on a publicly accessible web server, e.g. http://www.some-unknown-place.net/my-picture.gif. You cannot link to pictures stored on your own PC (unless it is a publicly accessible server) nor to images stored behind authentication mechanisms such as Hotmail or Yahoo mailboxes, password-protected sites, etc. To display the image use either the BBCode [img] tag or appropriate HTML (if allowed).

As for Nora, I think her and JJ's relationship is really one for the ages. Not only did she inspire him in all of her "ordinariness," but we probably wouldn't have Ulysses and FW without her -- though she thought Joyce should have been a singer and wished that he didn't spend all of his time writing his "silly" books, she was very patient with him, and obviously supported his artistic vision and Bohemian lifestyle. And, of course, it was the handjob she gave Joyce on June 16, 1904, that inspired him to pick that date for Ulysses. It was the first time they had "sex," if you can call it that. And it was Nora who said, "What's all this talk about Ulysses? Finnegans Wake is the important book."

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Para 5

Post  tony smyth on Mon Feb 18, 2013 2:47 am

FW Para 5
Part 1: Bygmester Finnegan, of the Stuttering Hand, freemen’s maurer, lived in the broadest way immarginable in his rushlit toofar — back for messuages before joshuan judges had given us numbers or Helviticus committed deuteronomy (one yeastyday he sternely struxk his tete in a tub for to watsch the future of his fates but ere he swiftly stook it out again, by the might of moses, the very water was eviparated and all the guenneses had met their exodus so that ought to show you what a pentschanjeuchy chap he was!) and during mighty odd years this man of hod, cement and edifices in Toper’s Thorp piled buildung supra buildung pon the banks for the livers by the Soangso.

Lots of reference to Finnegan as builder, and to Moses and Old Testament. According to Tyndall this paragraph concerns creation- the making of towers, love and books.
Bymester – master builder in Danish via Ibsen (JJ was big Ibsen fan)
a primitive "maurer" (German mason)
Freemens maurer - The Freeman's Journal was the oldest nationalist newspaper in Ireland. It was founded in 1763 and was Charles Stewart Parnell's biggest supporter. Parnell was brought down by a scandal (affair with another guys wife).
Joshua became the leader of the Israelite tribes after the death of Moses
Helveticus: (Latin) Swiss → Ulysses was largely written in Switzerland
deuteronomy speeches delivered to the Israelites by Moses on the plains of Moab, shortly before they enter the Promised Land
Yeast – rises, one of the themes of FW
sternely struxk his tete in a tub for to watsch the future of his fates but ere he swiftly stook it out again – Swift and Sterne (only know this because I re-read first chapter of Coincidance,
the very water was eviparated and all the guenneses had met their exodus: - Moses parting the Red Sea and the Exodus from Egypt
pentschanjeuchy: Pentateuch: the first five books of Jewish and Christian Scriptures
hod, cement and edifices = hce
piled buildung supra buildung pon the banks for the livers = Finnegan building on the banks of the Liffey?
Soangso.- so and so (wherever) , substitute for a name not exactly remembered.

Part 2: He addle liddle phifie Annie ugged the little craythur. Wither hayre in honds tuck up your part inher. Oftwhile balbulous, mithre ahead, with goodly trowel in grasp and ivoroiled overalls which he habitacularly fondseed, like Haroun Childeric Eggeberth he would caligulate by multiplicables the alltitude and malltitude until he seesaw by neatlight of the liquor wheretwin ’twas born, his roundhead staple of other days to rise in undress maisonry upstanded (joygrantit!), a waalworth of a skyerscape of most eyeful hoyth entowerly, erigenating from next to nothing and celescalating the himals and all, hierarchitectitiptitoploftical, with a burning bush abob off its baubletop and with larrons o’toolers clittering up and tombles a’buckets clottering down.

He addle liddle phifie Annie ugged the little craythur
- name Annie as Finnegans wife, ALP, very childish language, very Irish in the little craythur, (would be pronounced cray-chur in the west of Ireland)
Wither hayre in honds – hare and hounds (twins reference?)
tuck up your part inher. – sex
Hierarchitectitiptitoploftical – levels, bulding, levels, top
larrons o’toolers – Lawrence O’Toole was Dublin's archbishop from 1162 to 1180 and gained a reputation as a skillful mediator between rival Gaelic and Norman factions then fighting for power in Ireland. First native Irish Archbishop
balbulous – from Finnegans Wiki: balbus: (Latin) stammering → in FW HCE's stammer is indicative of his guilt. balbulus: (Latin) stammering, stuttering. bibulous: addicted to strong drink. Fabulous. Balbus: a Roman who built a wall → A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ch 1: "And behind the door of one of the closets there was a drawing in red pencil of a bearded man in a Roman dress with a brick in each hand and underneath was the name of the drawing: Balbus was building a wall." → Cicero, Letters to Atticus XII: [amazing how much Joyce has condensed into one word!!)
mithre – mitre/miter, religiouos staff held by a bishop.
Trowel/ overalls – Finnegans job as maker of walls
habitacularly fondseed – habit, habit and fond of, seed suggest sex
H. C. E. Childers - celebrated 19th Century British politician and statesman. Towards the end of his ministerial career he was noted for his girth, and so acquired the nickname "Here Comes Everybody".
Caligulate by multiplicables - Caligula , lunatic roman emperor, calculate, multiplication tables
the alltitude and malltitude – kind of has a feel of kid learning math by rote, also altitude, Finnegan falls off wall
seesaw by neatlight of the liquor wheretwin ’twas born- seesaw = backwards and forwards, wheretwin = the twins
Roundhead – this is reference to the helmets Cromwell’s troop wore. Invaded Ireland and killed any native/Catholic resistance. Protestant Vs Catholic. Native VS invader. Twins duelling,
undress maisonry upstanded – Finnegans wall, sexual imagery
a waalworth of a skyerscape of most eyeful hoyth entowerly _ Woolworth, skyscrapers/towers, tower of Howth Castle
erigenating – origin, start of fable, Adam and Eve?
burning bush – the location at which Moses was appointed by God to lead the Israelites out of Egypt and into Canaan.
its baubletop – Tower of Babel, top of the wall,
clittering up and tombles a’buckets clottering down. Building the wall, Finnegan falling down


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para6

Post  tony smyth on Wed Feb 20, 2013 4:15 am

Of the first was he to bare arms and a name: Wassaily Booslaeugh of Riesengeborg. His crest of huroldry, in vert with ancillars, troublant, argent, a hegoak, poursuivant, horrid, horned. His scutschum fessed, with archers strung, helio, of the second. Hootch is for husbandman handling his hoe. Hohohoho, Mister Finn, you’re going to be Mister Finnagain! Comeday morm and, O, you’re vine! Sendday’s eve and, ah, you’re vinegar! Hahahaha, Mister Funn, you’re going to be fined again!
Warriors, heraldry, rise/rebirth, sense of a cycle happening
Wassaily Booslaeugh of Riesengeborg can’t make much of this other than the German final name
Argent, horned – suggest sexual erection and also building (the two seem combined a lot in FW), plus also heraldry terms
scutschum fessed – confessed?
Hootch – slang for cheap alcohol
Handling his hoe – masturbation and also building
Hohohoho, Mister Finn, you’re going to be Mister Finnagain- the cycle/ the rise
Comeday morm and, O, you’re vine – asleep, fine in the morning,
Vine, – wine
Vinegar – wine gone off, past its best

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Sun Feb 24, 2013 10:16 am

FW Para 7
Part 1
What then agentlike brought about that tragoady thundersday this municipal sin business? Our cubehouse still rocks as earwitness to the thunder of his arafatas but we hear also through successive ages that shebby choruysh of unkalified muzzlenimiissilehims that would blackguardise the whitestone ever hurtleturtled out of heaven. Stay us wherefore in our search for tighteousness, O Sustainer, what time we rise and when we take up to toothmick and before we lump down upown our leatherbed and in the night and at the fading of the stars! For a nod to the nabir is better than wink to the wabsanti. Otherways wesways like that provost scoffing bedoueen the jebel and the jpysian sea. Cropherb the crunch-bracken shall decide. Then we’ll know if the feast is a flyday. She has a gift of seek on site and she allcasually ansars helpers, the dreamydeary.
Thundersday = Thursday (day of Finnegans tragic death)
municipal sin – original sin
muzzlenimiissilehims – Arabic words combined
blackguardise - blackguard is a bad person in Ireland ( my Dad used to use this word) . Always pronounced “blaggard”, this is a word used primarily by the older Irish generation. It’s also used as a verb to indicate someone’s behaviour: “He’s only blaggardin’ ya”. The origins of this word have been lost to time, but the OED dates it back to the 15th century. It is thought to refer either to the colour of someone’s soul (black) or perhaps the colour worn by the stern, elite guards of the King.
Stay us wherefore in our search for tighteousness, O Sustainer: sort of based on a catholic prayer. (help us in our search for righteousness, o lord?)
For a nod to the nabir is better than wink to the wabsanti. Same rhythm as ‘a bird in the bush is worth two in the hand’. Nabi is the Arabic name for a prophet. In the Qur’an there were twenty-five prophets, Muhammad being the last one. The nadir is the lowest point of someone’s misfortune. Absent + santi is Italian for saint.
bedoueen the jebel and the jpysian sea. "Between the devil and the deep blue sea" is an idiom meaning a dilemma—i.e., to choose between two undesirable situations (equivalent to "between a rock and a hard place"). Also Egyptian sea – Moses parting Red Sea?
Cropherb – prophet?, proverb,
Then we’ll know if the feast is a flyday. According to Campbell, this is a key theme of FW: in a communion feast the substance of All-father is served by all-Mother to the universal company. Also references Catholic mass in which body of Christ is symbolically consumed. So death Thursday, feast Friday
she allcasually ansars helpers, the dreamydeary. – maybe ALP type language here.

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:28 am

Para 7 pt2
Finnegans fall from the wall
Heed! Heed! It may half been a missfired brick, as some say, or it mought have been due to a collupsus of his back promises, as others looked at it. (There extand by now one thousand and one stories, all told, of the same). But so sore did abe ite ivvy’s holired abbles, (what with the wallhall’s horrors of rolls-rights, carhacks, stonengens, kisstvanes, tramtrees, fargobawlers, autokinotons, hippohobbilies, streetfleets, tournintaxes, mega-phoggs, circuses and wardsmoats and basilikerks and aeropagods and the hoyse and the jollybrool and one thousand and one stories and the mecklenburk bitch bite at his ear and the merlinburrow burrocks and his fore old porecourts, the bore the more, and his blightblack workingstacks at twelvepins a dozen and the noobi-busses sleighding along Safetyfirst Street and the derryjellybies snooping around Tell–No-Tailors’ Corner and the fumes and the hopes and the strupithump of his ville’s indigenous romekeepers, homesweepers, domecreepers, thurum and thurum in fancymud murumd and all the uproor from all the aufroofs, a roof for may and a reef for hugh butt under his bridge suits tony) wan warning Phill filt tippling full. His howd feeled heavy, his hoddit did shake. (There was a wall of course in erection) Dimb! He stot-tered from the latter. Damb! he was dud. Dumb! Mastabatoom, mastabadtomm, when a mon merries his lute is all long. For whole the world to see.

one thousand and one stories: the thousand and one nights; Middle eastern imagery
abe ite ivvy’s holired abbles- Liffey, Eve, red apples, Abraham? , the AB combination that RAW mentions in Coincidance, Eve tempting Adam in the Garden of Eden
The whole section in brackets: imagery of people, automation, life in Dublin, but also the far east – pagods,
stonengens, kisstvanes: kistvaen: a box-shaped or boat-shaped tomb from the Stone Age (from the Welsh cist, "chest", and maen, "stone") → this paragraph corresponds to Vico's third age, which is characterized by the institution of burial ( from FW Wiki) also stonehenge, stone age. (burial references)
Basilikerks, romekeepers: Basilicas, priests
fore old porecourts
– the poor old Four Courts, actual building so named, where there are 4 courts. Its on the Liffey.
noobi-busses sleighding along Safetyfirst Street: suggests maybe horse drawn trams going along Sackville St, now called O’Connell St, biggest st in Dublin.
thurum and thurum in fancymud murumd and all the uproor from all the aufroofs –sounds of the city
roof for may and a reef for hugh butt under his bridge suits tony - Butt bridge crosses the Liffey. Couldnt find anything for May hugh = Mayhew a surname .
Mastabatoom, mastabadtomm Egyptian stone mummy for the dead, plus sound effect like the thunder sound as Finnegan falls off the ladder

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Tue Feb 26, 2013 9:35 am

FW para 8
Shize? I should shee! Macool, Macool, orra whyi deed ye diie? of a trying thirstay mournin? Sobs they sighdid at Fillagain’s chrissormiss wake, all the hoolivans of the nation, prostrated in their consternation and their duodisimally profusive plethora of ululation. There was plumbs and grumes and cheriffs and citherers and raiders and cinemen too. And the all gianed in with the shout-most shoviality. Agog and magog and the round of them agrog. To the continuation of that celebration until Hanandhunigan’s extermination! Some in kinkin corass, more, kankan keening. Belling him up and filling him down. He’s stiff but he’s steady is Priam Olim! ’Twas he was the dacent gaylabouring youth. Sharpen his pillowscone, tap up his bier! E’erawhere in this whorl would ye hear sich a din again? With their deepbrow fundigs and the dusty fidelios. They laid him brawdawn alanglast bed. With a bockalips of finisky fore his feet. And a barrowload of guenesis hoer his head. Tee the tootal of the fluid hang the twoddle of the fuddled, O!
Shize: isn’t this like the German name for shit? Not sure how spelled. Also shize looks like it might be Hebrew. Anyone?
Macool, Macool,:Now he is FinnMcCool,
orra whyi deed ye diie? Very Irish, exactly how it would be said in the West of Ireland
of a trying thirstay mournin: dry and thirsty morning. Think this relates to song lyrics
According to Tindall all the words ending in –tion are the 12 mourners.
Agrog drunken
Some in kinkin corass, more, kankan keening. Belling him up and filling him down: singing in chorus, crying, praising and criticising him
continuation ... celebration ...extermination: Latinisms, associated with The Twelve mourners/jurors(Wiki)

Priam Olim: amazing how much Joyce fits into this name, if the wiki is to be believed.
• Priam: the king of Troy during the Trojan War
• Brian O'Linn: (song) Irish song with innumerable verses about a man who always sees the bright side of a difficult situation → the Four Old Men's four comments in this paragraph are in the rhythm of Brian O'Linn
• prius: (Latin) before
• olim: (Latin) once
• Priapus: a Greek god of fertility whose attribute was the phallus → stiff
Sharpen his pillowscone, tap up his bier : Scone: a place in Scotland; the Stone of Scone was supposedly the Lia Fáil, or Stone of Destiny, a monolith taken from Tara which roared its approbation when the true High King of Ireland was crowned; it is now the Coronation Stone in Westminster Abbey. Also pillow stone, pillar stone.
E’erawhere in this whorl would ye hear sich a din again? Noise at the wake, where in the world would you here such a thing again? Very Irish expression, maybe in lyrics of the time?
the dusty fidelios: adeste fideles- latin hymn still sung these days. Same tune as Oh come all ye faithful.
With a bockalips of finisky fore his feet. And a barrowload of guenesis hoer his head.Whiskey at his feet, Guiness at his head
Tee the tootal of the fluid hang the twoddle of the fuddled, O! Joyce having fun here: teetotal never drinks alcohol. Fuddled suggests drunkenness. Also, this a is a play on an old Irish song called Phil the fluters ball. Original like this, note the O! at the end is the same :

With the (G)toot of the flute, And the (C)twiddle of the (G)fiddle, O;
Hopping in the middle, like a herrin' on the (D)griddle, O.
(G)Up! down, hands aroun', (C)crossin' to the (G)wall
Oh!, hadn't we the gaiety at (C)Phil the (D)fluther's (G)ball cyclops cyclops

Once you work out what Joyce is doing in this paragraph its actually very funny. Gets rid of the idea that The Wake is just some very heavy obscure literary book. I'd imagine he had a lot of fun writing this part.


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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Fri Mar 01, 2013 11:45 am

FW Para 9
Hurrah, there is but young gleve for the owl globe wheels in view which is tautaulogically the same thing. Well, Him a being so on the flounder of his bulk like an overgrown babeling, let wee peep, see, at Hom, well, see peegee ought he ought, platterplate. Hum! From Shopalist to Bailywick or from ashtun to baronoath or from Buythebanks to Roundthehead or from the foot of the bill to ireglint’s eye he calmly extensolies. And all the way (a horn!) from fiord to fjell his baywinds’ oboboes shall wail him rockbound (hoahoahoah!) in swimswamswum and all the livvy-long night, the delldale dalppling night, the night of bluerybells, her flittaflute in tricky trochees (O carina! O carina!) wake him. With her issavan essavans and her patterjackmartins about all them inns and ouses. Tilling a teel of a tum, telling a toll of a tea-ry turty Taubling. Grace before Glutton. For what we are, gifs a gross if we are, about to believe. So pool the begg and pass the kish for crawsake. Omen. So sigh us. Grampupus is fallen down but grinny sprids the boord. Whase on the joint of a desh? Fin-foefom the Fush. Whase be his baken head? A loaf of Singpan — try’s Kennedy bread. And whase hitched to the hop in his tayle? A glass of Danu U’Dunnell’s foamous olde Dobbelin ayle. But, lo, as you would quaffoff his fraudstuff and sink teeth through that pyth of a flowerwhite bodey behold of him as behemoth for he is noewhemoe. Finiche! Only a fadograph of a yestern scene. Almost rubicund Salmosalar, ancient fromout the ages of the Ag-apemonides, he is smolten in our mist, woebecanned and packt away. So that meal’s dead off for summan, schlook, schlice and goodridhirring.

Him a being so on the flounder of his bulk like an overgrown babeling: He’s lying down like an overgown child
let wee peep, see, at Hom: lets look at Finnegans bulk lying down.
Shopalist to Bailywick or from ashtun to baronoath or from Buythebanks to Roundthehead or from the foot of the bill to ireglint’s eye he calmly extensolies.: Finnegan as giant lies across Dublin.,Various place names mentioned: he calmly extensolies = HCE Earwicker/ Finnegan
Bailywick; Bailey Lighthouse: a lighthouse on Howth Head (F’s head), marks the nothernmost part of Dublin Bay
Shopalist: Chapelizod (F’s feet), near the Phoenix Park
ireglint’s eye = Irelands Eye, a small unoccupied island off Howth. The Baily Lighthouse faces towards Dublin Bay, probably the northernmost lighthouse. Ireland's Eye is on the other side of Howth head. Its clearly visible from the harbour. The Joyces lived for short time in a house above one end of the harbour. CAn still see the house today.
Ashtun Ashtown a village north of Dublin
Baranoath: barr an: (Irish) the top of the... The top of Howth . Howth is Finnegans head. Baron of Howth: A title in the Anglo-Irish Peerage held in the St. Lawrence family which existed from around 1625 to 1801, at which time it was elevated to an earldom. The family seat was at Howth Castle. (this from FW Wiki)
in swimswamswum and all the livvy-long night, the delldale dalppling night, the night of bluerybells, her flittaflute in tricky trochees (O carina! O carina!) wake him.: female watery ALP language and sounds
tea-ry turty Taubling. Dear Dirty Dublin. “Taubelin” German for “little dove.”
Grace before Glutton. For what we are, gifs a gross if we are, about to believe. So pool the begg and pass the kish for crawsake. Omen. So sigh us. A group gather round the giant to symbolically eat him. According to Campbell a key theme of the Wake – a communion feats in which the substance of all-father is served by all-mother to the universal company. Related to Catholic mass in which the body of Christ is symbolically eaten. [Grace before meals. For what we are about to receive. Amen . so say us]
pool the begg and pass the kish for crawsake. PoolBeg and The Kish are lighthouses somewhere of the east coast. Mentioned in daily weather reports
Grampupus is fallen down but grinny sprids the boord. Grandfather grandmother. Finnegan being ritually prepared for eating.
Fin-foefom the Fush.- kids song – fee, fie, foe fomb, I smell the blood of an English-man.
A loaf of Singpan — try’s Kennedy bread. Kenedys bread , the company still in business after all this time (awful bread though!)
A glass of Danu U’Dunnell’s foamous olde Dobbelin ayle. But, lo, as you would quaffoff his fraudstuff and sink teeth through that pyth of a flowerwhite bodey behold of him as behemoth for he is noewhemoe. – getting ready to eaty and drink, including eating his giant white body, but suddenly he is gone.
Finiche! Only a fadograph of a yestern scene. Faded, photograph, yesterday, western
Salmosalar: Salmo salar: the Atlantic salmon (both words being related to the Latin salire, "to leap") → in FW HCE is identified not only with Finn MacCool but also with the Salmon of Knowledge which Finn eats → the life-cycle of the salmon, as salmon go back to their place of origin to die ( this tale of Finn eating the salmon and gaining wisdom from this magic fish is well known in Ireland). Salmanazar: a large-sized wine bottle (from FW Wiki)
Ag-apemonides: Agape: a love feast (Greek: agape, love); the early Christians held a love-feast in conjunction with the Lord's Supper when the rich provided food for the poor. agapemone: a free-love institution. Also mouth agape (wide open)
smolten in our mist, woebecanned and packt away.; Smolt is an early stage in a salmons life cycle, also have cycle of going from river to sea and then returning to spawn. Canned salmon?
schlook, schlice and goodridhirring: red herring, false lead. Good riddance.


Last edited by tony smyth on Sun Mar 03, 2013 11:59 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Salmon of knowledge?

Post  fly agaric on Sun Mar 03, 2013 9:50 pm

Wow Tony, your really doing it. Great work.

To jump in right here...i would like to add this quote from Peter Lamborn Wilson (Irish Soma) that gives us a good lens for trawling the Wake, and a focus on SALMON. On the look out for elixirs, magic brews and to uncover psychoactive compounds. Joyce's 'nat language' itself acts like a psychoactive compound, i think.

"The Irish material abounds in references to magical substances which bestow knowledge and/or pleasure when ingested. Perhaps the best-known are the hazelnuts of wisdom, eaten by the Salmon, fished up by the Druid, and cooked by young Finn--who, as "sorcerer's apprentice", burns his thumb on the Salmon's skin, sticks thumb in mouth, and attains all the wisdom in his master's stead. The "shamanic" overtones of this story are quite obvious.--Peter Lamborn Wilson, Irish Soma.

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Sun Mar 03, 2013 11:53 pm

Yep, thats the one. Got to know that story as a kid. Not sure if its still taught in schools, but probably. Also the druid had been trying to catch that salmon all his life. Then, having finally caught it, the young kid who is cooking it for him touches the skin, burns his finger, then puts the finger in his mouth and ingests the salmons wisdom (as it were). Also fits with the Wake theme of the young son in competition with the father figure. There's a statue of Cuchulain dying in the GPO in Dublin - site of the HQ of Irish resistance in the 1916 Rising. (and it is said as the RISING in Dublin!!!) Cant remember if Cuchulain and FinnMcCool are the same person. Must check that out.

Anyway feel free to contribute. Dont want to do this whole book on my own. albino albino

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Mon Mar 04, 2013 12:09 am

More Finnstuff: Every year for twenty-three years at Samhain (Irish festival to mark end of harvest, at end of October), the fire-breathing fairy Aillen would lull the men of Tara to sleep with his music before burning the palace to the ground, and the Fianna, led by Goll mac Morna, were powerless to prevent it. Fionn arrived at Tara, armed with his father's crane-skin bag of magical weapons. He kept himself awake by sticking the point of his own spear into his forehead. The pain would not let him sleep and then Fionn killed Aillen with the same spear. After that his heritage was recognised and he was given command of the Fianna:

Accounts of Fionn's death vary; according to the most popular, he is not dead at all, rather, he sleeps in a cave somewhere beneath Ireland, surrounded by the rest of the Fianna. One day they will awake and defend Ireland in the hour of her greatest need. In both Irish and Manx popular folklore, Fionn mac Cumhail (known as "Finn McCool" or "Finn MacCooill" respectively) is portrayed as a magical, benevolent giant.

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Mon Mar 04, 2013 9:53 am

FW Para 10
Yet may we not see still the brontoichthyan form outlined a-slumbered, even in our own nighttime by the sedge of the trout — ling stream that Bronto loved and Brunto has a lean on. Hic cubat edilis. Apud libertinam parvulam. Whatif she be in flags or flitters, reekierags or sundyechosies, with a mint of mines or beggar a pinnyweight. Arrah, sure, we all love little Anny Ruiny, or, we mean to say, lovelittle Anna Rayiny, when unda her brella, mid piddle med puddle, she ninnygoes nannygoes nancing by. Yoh! Brontolone slaaps, yoh snoores. Upon Benn Heather, in Seeple Isout too. The cranic head on him, caster of his reasons, peer yu-thner in yondmist. Whooth? His clay feet, swarded in verdigrass, stick up starck where he last fellonem, by the mund of the maga-zine wall, where our maggy seen all, with her sisterin shawl. While over against this belles’ alliance beyind Ill Sixty, ollol-lowed ill! bagsides of the fort, bom, tarabom, tarabom, lurk the ombushes, the site of the lyffing-inwait of the upjock and hock-ums. Hence when the clouds roll by, jamey, a proudseye view is enjoyable of our mounding’s mass, now Wallinstone national museum, with, in some greenish distance, the charmful water-loose country and the two quitewhite villagettes who hear show of themselves so gigglesomes minxt the follyages, the prettilees! Penetrators are permitted into the museomound free. Welsh and the Paddy Patkinses, one shelenk! Redismembers invalids of old guard find poussepousse pousseypram to sate the sort of their butt. For her passkey supply to the janitrix, the mistress Kathe. Tip.

Yet may we not see still the brontoichthyan form outlined a-slumbered, even in our own nighttime by the sedge of the trout — ling stream: the form of the fallen giant lying beside the Liffey
Brontoichthyan: Brontosaurus + Ichthyosaurus: types of dinosaur. Ithyphallic: used of representations of the erect penis in art, and meaning lascivious by extension
Bronto loved and Brunto has a lean on: could be the twins, but also Vico and Bruno. Has lean on = hard on = erection??
Hic cubat edilis. HCE
apud libertinam parvulam: (Latin) beside the little freedwoman ALP
Whatif she be in flags or flitters, reekierags or sundyechosies, with a mint of mines or beggar a pinnyweight.: what if shes badly or well dressed, rags/riches, reeking clothes or Sunday best, minted or a beggar,
Pinnyweight: pennyweight - a measure of weight, equal to 24 grains, 120 of an ounce
little Anny Ruiny: Little Annie Rooney: (song) a song written in 1890; also the name a comic strip about a young orphaned girl who traveled about with her dog, Zero., and of a silent movie from 1925
she ninnygoes nannygoes nancing by: suggest a little girl dancing in the rain
Brontolone: brontosauraus, alone
Benn Heather: a JJ version of Beann Éadair, Binn Éadair: (Irish) Gaelic names for Howth. (pronounced Byow-n Ey-dir) , also heather, the plant
Seeple Isout too: Steeple, Seipéal Iosaid (Irish) - Chapelizod,
The cranic head on him, caster of his reasons, peer yu-thner in yondmist. Whooth? His clay feet, swarded in verdigrass, stick up starck where he last fellonem, by the mund of the maga-zine wall, where our maggy seen all, with her sisterin shawl.[/i The giants head/skull is Howth Head. His clay feet stick up from the grass where he fell by the mound of the magazine wall, in Phoenix Park. (Apparently a magazine that stored ammunition when the Brit army was in Ireland, occupying us, THE BASTARDS!!)
[i]our maggy seen all, with her sisterin shawl:
seems to be different interpretations of who the maggies are, but are definitely connected with some vague sexual offence that Finnegan was supposed to have committed.
Ill sixty: Hill 60 - In WW I, an important feature of the Ypres salient, SE of Ypres. Changed hands many times in 1st and 2nd Battles of Ypres
ollol-lowed ill! bagsides of the fort, bom, tarabom, tarabom, lurk the ombushes, the site of the lyffing-inwait of the upjock and hock-ums: Hollow hill, beside the fort, sound of battle, ambush, “up guards and at them” – last order given by Wellington at the battle of Waterloo.
Hence when the clouds roll by, jamey, a proudseye view is enjoyable of our mounding’s mass, now Wallinstone national museum: Jamey is one sort of non offensive way of saying 'Jesus' as an expression, used to be common in Ireland. The mound is an obelisk in the Phoenix Park, erected in 1817 to commemorate the Duke of Wellington. Phallic symbol for Finnegan.
water-loose – Waterloo, but also urine and toilet (loo slang for toilet).
two quitewhite villagettes who hear show of themselves so gigglesomes minxt the follyages, the prettilees! – 2 girls in the foliage
Penetrators are permitted into the museomound free: soldiers allowed into the museum free. Also sexual penetration hint?
Welsh and the Paddy Patkinses, one shelenk! Paddy, a slang term in British English for an Irish person. Tommy Atkins is term in general use for a common British soldier. One shilling, a twentyfourth part of Pound (in old money before decimalisation)
poussepousse pousseypram : pousser: (French) to push, push-pram: a wheelchair for crippled war veterans
Janitrix: get the passkey to the museum from the female janitor

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Wed Mar 06, 2013 11:32 am

Para 11 pt 1
This the way to the museyroom. Mind your hats goan in! Now yiz are in the Willingdone Museyroom. This is a Prooshi-ous gunn. This is a ffrinch. Tip. This is the flag of the Prooshi — ous, the Cap and Soracer. This is the bullet that byng the flag of the Prooshious. This is the ffrinch that fire on the Bull that bang the flag of the Prooshious. Saloos the Crossgunn! Up with your pike and fork! Tip. (Bullsfoot! Fine!) This is the triplewon hat of Lipoleum. Tip. Lipoleumhat. This is the Willingdone on his same white harse, the Cokenhape. This is the big Sraughter Wil-lingdone, grand and magentic in his goldtin spurs and his ironed dux and his quarterbrass woodyshoes and his magnate’s gharters and his bangkok’s best and goliar’s goloshes and his pullupon-easyan wartrews. This is his big wide harse. Tip. This is the three lipoleum boyne grouching down in the living detch. This is an inimyskilling inglis, this is a scotcher grey, this is a The regiments was called The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. This is the bog lipoleum mordering the lipoleum beg. A Gallawghurs argaumunt. This is the petty lipoleum boy that was nayther bag nor bug. Assaye, assaye! Touchole Fitz Tuo-mush. Dirty MacDyke. And Hairy O’Hurry. All of them arminus-varminus. This is Delian alps. This is Mont Tivel, this is Mont Tipsey, this is the Grand Mons Injun.

War/sex images in the Wellington Museum. Tindall has this whole passage to be about family conflict and puns on the names of battles.
Willingdone Museyroom – the Wellington museum
Prooshi-ous - precious
Ffrinch - French
Tip – I read, from RAW I think, that the ‘Tip’ repeated is the branches of a tree tapping against the window that attempt to wake Finnegan from the depths of sleep. A tip is also a dump. So a dump of military objects.
Lipoleum – Napoleon
big wide harse- horse. arse
Cokenhape- Copenhagen: Wellington’s horse at Waterloo. Copenhagen: Danish city; the scene of a British victory in 1807 involving Wellington; the birthplace of Hans Christian Andersen (1805-75)
his pullupon-easyan wartrews. Peloponnesian War. pull up/ pull on, easy on. Waterloo → war - waterloose. trews: close-fitting trousers
the three lipoleum boyne grouching down in the living detch: According to FW Wiki the following - three Napoleon boys → Napoleon I, Napoleon II and Napoleon III → Shem, Shaun and the combined Shem-Shaun character. Also the River Boyne: a river in Ireland → the Battle of the Boyne, 1 July 1690, which has been called "Ireland's Waterloo". The Battle of the Boyne was fought in 1690 between two rival claimants of the English, Scottish, and Irish thrones – the Catholic King James and the Protestant King William (who had deposed James in 1688). The battle, won by William, was a turning point in James' unsuccessful attempt to regain the crown and ultimately helped ensure the continuation of Protestant ascendancy in Ireland. The symbolic importance of this battle has made it one of the best-known battles in British–Irish history and it is a key part of the folklore for the Orange Order. Its commemoration today is principally by the Protestant Orange Institution. It is especially remembered as a crucial moment in the struggle between Irish Protestant and Catholic interests.

the three lipoleum boyne grouching down in the living detch: Could also be three English soldiers in the Phoenix Park, hiding in a ditch.
This is an inimyskilling inglis, this is a scotcher grey, this is a davy, stooping. Regiments at the battle of Waterloo: The regiments of The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, and Scotch Grey regiments,
a davy, stooping is buggering. Probably pretty common in armies.

This is the bog lipoleum mordering the lipoleum beg: H’mm. well the bog part can refer to muddy conditions of the battle field (true at Waterloo) or to Ireland. However, the word small in Irish beag is pronounced either beg or Byug, depending on which part of the country it is spoken. One interpretation of this sentence I found is this: Joyce makes his views of the Battle obvious when he says Lipoleum beg. Lipoleum has already been described as an insult hurled at the French leader. Beg is an Anglo Irish word meaning small. He calls Napoleon the small, fat. greasy leader of an army. Little Napoleon, can be understood as Shem, the devil, as opposed to Bog lipoleum (big Napoleon, Shaun). Personally I’m not convinced, but maybe.

Gallawghurs argaumunt: gallowglass: a mercenary soldier in medieval Ireland, Gawilghur: a fortress in northern India, Gallagher, a common surname but why a Gallagher argument?
This is the petty lipoleum boy that was nayther bag nor bug. Portait of Napoleon when he was neither big nor small??
Assaye: The Battle of Assaye. Major General Arthur Wellesley’s (later the Duke of Wellington) important defeat of the Mahratta army, opening the way for the British conquest of Central India
Touchole Fitz Tuo-mush. Dirty MacDyke. And Hairy O’Hurry: Tom, Dick and Harry combined with slang for vaginas!!! Laughing Laughing (also 3 soldiers in Park?)
arminus-varminus: Arminius: Hermann (16 BC-21 CE), German warlord, the liberator of Germania; he defeated Varus in the Teutoburg Wald (9 CE). Jacobus Arminius: Dutch theologian and religious reformer; the founder of Arminianism (a liberal type of Calvinism emphasizing God’s love rather than his justice). Artemis: Greek goddess of the hunt and of virginity, born in Delos, where her cult was centered. Varus: Publius Quinctilius Varus, governor of Germania, defeated by Arminius at Teutoburg Forest in 9 CE; he committed suicide. Vermin/ verminous
Delian alps: (from FW Wiki) Julian Alps: the mountains which overlook Trieste (where JJ and Nora first lived after they left Ireland); the highest peak is called Tricorno → triplewon hat (Napoleon wore a tricorn hat) Delian League: a Greek confederacy founded in 477 BC, and so-called because its treasury was originally on the island of Delos; the Delian League was the Athenian-led faction in the Peloponnesian War. Delia: in Greek mythology, another name for goddess Artemis, who was born (with her brother Apollo) on the island of Delos. Delia Bacon: American author of the so-called "Baconian Theory", according to which the plays of Shakespeare were actually written by Francis Bacon
Mont Tivel: Nivelles: a Belgian town close to Waterloo; a key point in the Waterloo campaign. mont: (French) mountain
Mont Tipsey: tipsey, bit drunk, but also mont: (French) mount → to mount = to engage in sexual intercourse with. teipsum: (Latin) yourself → Mont Tipsey = mount yourself = masturbate, which HCE appears to engage in in this episode
the Grand Mons Injun: mons: a mound of fatty tissue covering the pubic area in women. Also, Mont St Jean: a village south of Waterloo and just north of the site of the Battle of Waterloo; Wellington was stationed on the plateau of Mont-Saint-Jean with the village behind him → Mont St Jean was the name the English army gave to the Battle of Waterloo → Napoleon believed that Mont St Jean was the key to Wellington’s position. Mons: a city in Belgium close to Waterloo → the Battle of Mons, 23 August 1914, was the first battle of the British Expeditionary Force in World War I.

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Fri Mar 08, 2013 10:47 am

Para11 pt 2
This is the crimealine of the alps hooping to sheltershock the three lipoleums. This is the jinnies with their legahorns feinting to read in their handmade’s book of stralegy while making their war undisides the Willingdone. The jinnies is a cooin her hand and the jinnies is a ravin her hair and the Willingdone git the band up. This is big Willingdone mormorial tallowscoop Wounderworker obscides on the flanks of the jinnies. Sexcaliber hrosspower. Tip. This is me Belchum sneaking his phillippy out of his most Awful Grimmest Sunshat Cromwelly. Looted. This is the jinnies’ hast-ings dispatch for to irrigate the Willingdone. Dispatch in thin red lines cross the shortfront of me Belchum. Yaw, yaw, yaw! Leaper Orthor. Fear siecken! Fieldgaze thy tiny frow. Hugacting. Nap. That was the tictacs of the jinnies for to fontannoy the Willingdone. Shee, shee, shee! The jinnies is jillous agincourting all the lipoleums. And the lipoleums is gonn boycottoncrezy onto the one Willingdone. And the Willingdone git the band up. This is bode Belchum, bonnet to busby, breaking his secred word with a ball up his ear to the Willingdone. This is the Willingdone’s hur-old dispitchback. Dispitch desployed on the regions rare of me Belchum. Salamangra! Ayi, ayi, ayi! Cherry jinnies. Figtreeyou! Damn fairy ann, Voutre. Willingdone. That was the first joke of Willingdone, tic for tac. Hee, hee, hee! This is me Belchum in his twelvemile cowchooks, weet, tweet and stampforth foremost, footing the camp for the jinnies.
Battles, French swearing and sexual inuendo.

Crimealine
- crimea (charge of the light brigade), crinoline: a hooped skirt; a fabric used for hoop-petticoats
Hoop of the crinoline
Sheltershock: shell shock, shelter (still war imagery)
the jinnies: two girls in the Park? , Jenny (name),
Leghorn: Livorno, Italy, a seaport taken by Napoleon in 1796, legions (of French Army)
their handmade’s book of stralegy: handmade, maid, strategy
undisides the Willingdone: beside, under, the Wellington ( monument)
cooin her hand and the jinnies is a ravin her hair: two girls flirting?
the Willingdone git the band up: bander: (French) to get an erection, get the wind up: to become nervous, apprehensive, agitated, git: (dialect) get. His ‘crime’ in the Park)
Willingdone mormorial: marmoreal: made of marble, resembling marble in hardness and smoothness, both big erection and memorial. mór: (Irish) big; great
obscides on the flanks of the jinnie; obsideo: (Latin) I blockade, obsidium: (Latin) a siege, obscene (military and sexual combined). Flanks – flank of meat, flank ( side) of an army, rank
Sexcaliber hrosspower: Excalibur: King Arthur’s sword, sex calibre. Horsepower

Belchum: Belgium
sneaking his phillippy out: speaking his philippic → a philippic is a discourse full of invective, after the three Philippics of the Athenian orator Demosthenes against Philip of Macedon. sneaking his filly> Also sneaking ** out suggests Earwicker’s crime in the park. maybe
Awful Grimmest Sunshat Cromwelly: Arthur Guinness – maker of Guinness beer in Dublin. Oliver Cromwell, English warlord who invaded Ireland in 1649 and ruthlessly suppressed the native Catholics; the latter had originally revolted in 1641 and later supported Charles I and his Royalists in the English Civil War. Shit – shat. Sunhat.Shit welly (wellington boot)
Looted: pillage during war
the jinnies’ hast-ings dispatch for to irrigate the Willingdone: Hastings: a town in Sussex → the Battle of Hastings, 14 October 1066, hastily,
Dispatch in thin red lines cross the shortfront of me Belchum: Brit army red uniform fighting in Belgium. shopfront: the part of a shop (or, in this case, HCE's tavern) that faces on to the street, front: (military) a line of battle, cross the shortfront: across the short front
Leaper Orthor. Fear siecken! Fieldgaze thy tiny frow. Hugacting: from the WIKI:
Lieber Arthur. Wir siegen! Wie geht's deiner kleinen Frau? Hochachtung: (German) Dear Arthur. We conquer! How's your little wife? Yours faithfully liberator → the Liberator was a nickname for Daniel O’Connell, the Irish Catholic statesman whose election to the House of Commons forced the Duke of Wellington – the then Prime Minister of Great Britain – to introduce Catholic Emancipation in 1829. Dublin’s biggest street O’Connell St is named after him. leaper → HCE as the salmon of knowledge in Irish mythology (Finn McCuail) ; salmon means "leaper"
Nap.Napoleon

That was the tictacs of the jinnies for to fontannoy the Willingdone: Fontenoy: a village in Belgium → Battle of Fontenoy, 11 May 1745, in which Irish and French forces defeated the English. The tactics of the two girls to lure Earwicker?
The jinnies is jillous agincourting: Agincourt where the English defeated to French army. The girls are courting (old Irish word for having a date/ affair with)
Boycottoncrezy: Boycott. Cotton, Captain Charles Boycott: Irish land agent whose ostracism led to his name being used to describe the practice of "boycotting". Edward Cotton: author of A Voice from Waterloo
the Willingdone git the band up: bander: (French) to get an erection, get the wind up: to become nervous, apprehensive, agitated
breaking his secred word: break one's word: to fail to fulfil one's promise → Blücher’s famous reply to his troops that they must go on, as he had pledged his word to Wellington
hur-old dispitchback: Harold: English king who was defeated and killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, hurled dispatch
Salamangra: Salamanca, in Spain → Battle of Salamanca, 22 July 1812, in which Wellington was victorious, was part of the Peninsular War. Salamander: a woman who (ostensibly) lives chastely in the midst of temptations
Chère Jenny: (French) Dear Jenny → these are the opening words of the Willingdone's dispatch, i.e. his reply to the forged Jinnies' hastings dispatch which purported to come from Napoleon, cherie (dear), cherry
Figtreeyou: fig tree → Matthew 21.19, in which Christ curses a fig tree; according to some traditions, Judas hanged himself on a fig tree. fig: (Shakespearean) to insult someone by making an obscene sexual gesture in which the thumb is placed between the next two fingers. fichtre! (French) fuck you!
Damn fairy ann : Publish, and be damned! → Wellington's alleged response to a former mistress Harriette Wilson when she (or, rather, her publisher Stockdale) tried to blackmail him
Voutre: foutre: (French) to fuck → vous + foutre = fuck you!
the first joke of Willingdone: the first Duke of Wellington
tweet and stampforth foremost: Stamford: a town in Lincolnshire, England → Battle of Stamford, 1470, in the War of the Roses (English civil war)
footing the camp for the jinnies: a foot in the (military) camp, foutre le camp: (French Slang) to go, leave, fous le camp! fuck off! clear off! bugger off! fucking the cunt

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Mon Mar 11, 2013 11:18 am

Para 11 Pt3
Drink a sip, drankasup, for he’s as sooner buy a guinness than he’d stale store stout. This is Roo-shious balls. This is a ttrinch. This is mistletropes. This is Canon Futter with the popynose. After his hundred days’ indulgence. This is the blessed. Tarra’s widdars! This is jinnies in the bonny bawn blooches. This is lipoleums in the rowdy howses. This is the Willingdone, by the splinters of Cork, order fire. Tonnerre! (Bullsear! Play!) This is camelry, this is floodens, this is the solphereens in action, this is their mobbily, this is panickburns. Almeidagad! Arthiz too loose! This is Willingdone cry. Brum! Brum! Cumbrum! This is jinnies cry. Underwetter! Goat strip Finnlambs! This is jinnies rinning away to their ouster-lists dowan a bunkersheels. With a nip nippy nip and a trip trip — py trip so airy. For their heart’s right there. Tip. This is me Bel — chum’s tinkyou tankyou silvoor plate for citchin the crapes in the cool of his canister. Poor the pay! This is the bissmark of the marathon merry of the jinnies they left behind them. This is the Willingdone branlish his same marmorial tallowscoop Sophy–Key-Po for his royal divorsion on the rinnaway jinnies. Gam — bariste della porca! Dalaveras fimmieras! This is the pettiest of the lipoleums, Toffeethief, that spy on the Willingdone from his big white harse, the Capeinhope. Stonewall Willingdone is an old maxy montrumeny.
More war imagery plus HCE toilet

Stale = steal (with Irish accent)
is Roo-shious balls: Russian cannonballs
a ttrinch; FW Wiki: trench (military) a protective ditch, with the excavated earth used as a parapet; a deep furrow or wrinkle in the skin (this passage being a description not only of the Battle of Waterloo but also of HCE and ALP making love and of HCE in the privy). attrition: (military) the wearing down of an enemy
Canon Futter: cannon-fodder: (military) soldiers regarded merely as material to be expended on the battlefield, Futter: (German) fodder, food. Canon Futter: Sexual abuse of young boys and girls, or of nuns, by Catholic clergy (highly relevant in Ireland since Joyce’s day!!!).
Poppy; Small red flower sod to commemorate loss of British soldiers lives in war, esp. WW1 And WW2. (just typed brutish soldiers for that !!)
After his hundred days’ indulgence. indulgence: in the Catholic Church, a papal indulgence is the remission granted by the Church of the temporal punishment due to sins already forgiven by God, thus reducing the amount of time a deceased person's soul must suffer in Purgatory. Sale of them was a major cause of Luther’s reformation. Hundred days – hundred years war?
les blessés: (French) the wounded, the injured
Torres Vedras: a town in Portugal noted for the Lines of Torres Vedras, fortifications built at Wellington's behest during the Peninsular War. Tara. Northeast of Dublin where the high kings were resident.
bonny bawn blooches: blüchers: half-boots named after the Prussian Field-Marshal von Blücher, one of the victors at Waterloo, Could also refer to Bonny Prince Charlie, the second Jacobite pretender to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland.
the rowdy howses.- brothels

tonnerre: (French) thunder. Tonnerre! (French interjection) heavens above!
Bullsear – bulls eye ( to hit the )
Flodden: in Northumberland, England → Battle of Flodden Field, 9 September 1513, where James IV of Scotland lost to the English army, and was killed.
Solferino: a village in northern Italy → Battle of Solferino, 24 June 1859, in which Napoleon III defeated Franz Joseph of Austria. Sulphur (smell during battle)
this is their mobbily: Thermopylae: a place in ancient Greece → Battle of Thermopylae, 480 BC, in which the Spartans and Thespians made a heroic but doomed last stand against the invading Persians. Also mob and mobilise.
Panickburns: Panic. Also Bannockburn: a town in Scotland → Battle of Bannockburn, 23 June 1314, in which Robert Bruce of Scotland defeated Edward II of England
Almeidagad: Almeida: Portuguese town, captured by Wellington on 10 May 1811 during the Peninsular War
Arthiz too loose! Orthez: town in south-western France → Battle of Orthez, 27 February 1814, in which Wellington defeated the French. Toulouse: city in southern France → Battle of Toulouse, 10 April 1814, in which Wellington defeated the French, was the last battle of the Peninsular War. Armageddon??
Underwetter! Donnerwetter: (German interjection) confound you; damn! (literally: "thunder-weather"). under the weather. under water → Noah's Flood → the Battle of Waterloo was delayed due to torrential rain in the early morning
This is jinnies rinning away: Not only war imagery but also HCE on the toilet apparently. running away. rinne: (German) sewer → HCE on the toilet. rinnen: (German) to flow
ouster-lists : famous battle that Napoleon won,. Battle of Austerlitz, 12 December 1805, in which Napoleon defeated the Russians and Austrians
dowan a bunkersheels: down at heel: in poor or decayed circumstances; Bunker Hill: Massachusetts → Battle of Bunker Hill, 17 June 1775, War of Independence
and a trip trip — py trip so airy: Tipperary in Ireland → It’s a Long Way to Tipperary, a WWI song popular with the British forces

For my heart’s right there: a line from the chorus of It's a Long Way to Tipperary
citchin the crapes in the cool of his canister: catching the crap → HCE on the toilet in the outhouse ( reference to German toilets where the crap lands on a little paddle thing?) crêpe, crape: a fabric used for mourning clothes. Canister a holder, but also canister shot was canon shell anti-personnel ammunition.
Poor the pay! pour le paix: (French) for peace. the pay is poor
Marathon: Battle of Marathon, 490 BC, in which the Greeks defeated the Persians
the Willingdone branlish: Willingdon here is HCE. brandish. se branler: (French) to masturbate
Gam — bariste della porca: Giambattista Vico: Italian philosopher, author of La Scienza Nuove (The New Science), a key text for FW
Stonewall Willingdone: Stonewall Jackson: Confederate general during the American Civil War. stonewall: to hold up progress (in parliament) by obstructing discussion

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Mon Mar 18, 2013 11:17 am

Para 11 PT 4
Lipoleums is nice hung bushel-lors. This is hiena hinnessy laughing alout at the Willing — done. This is lipsyg dooley krieging the funk from the hinnessy. This is the hinndoo Shimar Shin between the dooley boy and the hinnessy. Tip. This is the wixy old Willingdone picket up the half of the threefoiled hat of lipoleums fromoud of the bluddle filth. This is the hinndoo waxing ranjymad for a bombshoob. This is the Willingdone hanking the half of the hat of lipoleums up the tail on the buckside of his big white harse. Tip. That was the last joke of Willingdone. Hit, hit, hit! This is the same white harse of the Willingdone, Culpenhelp, waggling his tailoscrupp with the half of a hat of lipoleums to insoult on the hinndoo see-boy. Hney, hney, hney! (Bullsrag! Foul!) This is the seeboy, madrashattaras, upjump and pumpim, cry to the Willingdone: Ap Pukkaru! Pukka Yurap! This is the Willingdone, bornstable ghentleman, tinders his maxbotch to the cursigan Shimar Shin. Basucker youstead! This is the dooforhim seeboy blow the whole of the half of the hat of lipoleums off of the top of the tail on the back of his big wide harse. Tip (Bullseye! Game!) How Copen-hagen ended. This way the museyroom. Mind your boots goan out.

bushel-lors- batchelors (Napoloeon?), well hung? Theres also a Batchelors Quay along the Liffey
hiena hinnessy: hyena (preys on death things!) Jena: German city → Battle of Jena, 14 October 1806, in which Napoleon defeated Prussia and Saxony. Hennessy whiskey
lipsyg dooley krieging: Leipzig –another Napoleonic battle, Krieg – German for war
hiena hinnessy, lipsyg Dooley, Shimar Shin; Tyndall has these as the names of the 3 soldiers.
This is the wixy old Willingdone picket up the half of the threefoiled hat of lipoleums fromoud of the bluddle filth.: Picking up the three cornered hat from out of the mud. Either one of the soldiers does it, our the Shem/Sean character.
This is the Willingdone hanking the half of the hat of lipoleums up the tail on the buckside of his big white harse.: seems to be two imnages at once. One is a soladier hanging the hat on the arse of Napoleons horse. The other is HCE wiping his arse, with what?
That was the last joke of Willingdone: the first Duke of Wellngton
Culpenhelp: Wellington's horse at Waterloo → Capeinhope. Copenhagen: Danish city associated with Hans Christian Andersen. culpa: (Latin) fault, as in mea culpa, Joyce would have know this as Catholic Mass in Latin in those days.
waggling his tailoscrupp with the half of a hat of lipoleums to insoult on the hinndoo see-boy: the crupper was piece of leather that went over the back (arse) of the horse. So in one sense the hat on the horse arsewas an insult, but also maybe HCEs arse, as he is also supposed to be taking a shit?? sepoy: an Indian soldier in European service → Napoleon referred to Wellington as "a general of sepoys"
Hney, hney, hney!: Ney: Ney, a French marshal who was at Waterloo, neigh: the cry of a horse
Madrashattaras: mad as a hatter: a phrase probably refers to the physiological effects of mercurious nitrate, which is used in the making of felt hats. The Mad Hatter: a character in Lewis Carroll’s Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865). Maratha: an Indian Confederacy of Maharashtra which fought three Anglo-Maratha wars against the British: 1775-82, 1803-05 (in which Wellington was victorious at Assaye and Argaon) and 1817-18. Madras: a city and state in SE India. Large british fort there even now. Shat – shit HCE in outhouse. Madrasa - place of learning for poor who cant afford other education
bornstable ghentleman: born ... stable ... gentleman: Wellington, on being "accused" of being Irish, replied: "Because a man is born in a stable that does not make him a horse". Barnstaple: a town in North Devon, 45 miles east of the town of Wellington in Somerset, from where the Duke of Wellington took his name
tinders his maxbotc: tinder and matchbox – to set of cannon? The Tinder Box: a fairy story by Hans Christian Andersen
to the cursigan Shimar Shin: Corsican: from Corsica, the birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte, curse again, Shem and Shaun
Basucker youstead: Battle Of Busaco, the Peninsular War, in which Wellington defeated the French. Estaed (you in Spanish). Bastard/Fuck you instead?
How Copen-hagen ended –HCE. also Wellingtons horse

Tyndall has this for this section: A hat is symbol of authority, but Earwicker is left hatless and arseless too. Henessy, Dooley and Shin are equivalent to Shem, the laughing drinker and predecessor of Buckley, the young man who will shoot the old Russian general. The son killing or unhorsing the father and taking his place.


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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Wed Mar 20, 2013 10:54 am

Para 12 Pt1
What a warm time we were in there but how keling is here the airabouts! We nowhere she lives but you mussna tell annaone for the lamp of Jig-a-Lanthern! It’s a candlelittle houthse of a month and one windies. Downadown, High Downadown. And num-mered quaintlymine. And such reasonable weather too! The wa — grant wind’s awalt’zaround the piltdowns and on every blasted knollyrock (if you can spot fifty I spy four more) there’s that gnarlybird ygathering, a runalittle, doalittle, preealittle, pouralittle, wipealittle, kicksalittle, severalittle, eatalittle, whinealittle, kenalittle, helfalittle, pelfalittle gnarlybird. A verytableland of bleakbardfields! Under his seven wrothschields lies one, Lumproar. His glav toside him. Skud ontorsed. Our pigeons pair are flewn for northcliffs. The three of crows have flapped it southenly, kraaking of de baccle to the kvarters of that sky whence triboos answer; Wail, ’tis well! She niver comes out when Thon’s on shower or when Thon’s flash with his Nixy girls or when Thon’s blowing toom-cracks down the gaels of Thon. No nubo no! Neblas on you liv! Her would be too moochy afreet. Of Burymeleg and Bindme-rollingeyes and all the deed in the woe. Fe fo fom! She jist does hopes till byes will be byes.

What a warm time we were in there: apparently, not only a reference to being in the museum, but also to HCE having sex with ALP
Jig-a-Lanthern: Jack o’ lantern. a Hallowe’en lantern made from a hollowed-out turnip with holes cut to resemble eyes, mouth and nose
candlelittle houthse: candlelit house. Also Howth
Downadown, High Downadown. ( FW Wiki) The Three Ravens: (song) "Down in yonder green field, down-a-down, hey, down-a-down, there lies a knight slain 'neath his shield" → Ravens suggests Issy, whose dark side is represented in FW by a raven, her light side being a dove; however, three suggests the familiar trio of Shem, Shaun and Shem-Shaun. Also Down is a county in northern Ireland. Eiderdown??
num-mered: Winter struggle between dark and light. Halloween, both an Irish version of All Souls day, and a time when Summer draws to an end and winter is coming. Therefore: Death and Resurrection. (Wake theme) As the days grew shorter and shorter approaching the winter solstice it seemed to our remote ancestors that the waning sun was in imminent danger of disappearing altogether. In earlier times human or animal sacrifice was offered to placate the gods. When this ceased people knew that something had to be done that would please these all-powerful, mysterious deities so they would restore the light, allow the days to lengthen and the forces of normality rebirth and regrowth to return. From time immemorial in Ireland the Christmas Mummers have practised sympathetic magic to achieve the same result. Following the struggle between the two hero figures, representing the fight between the forces of light and darkness, one falls to the ground. Also Shem and Shaun ref??

the piltdowns : Piltdown Man: alleged missing link in human evolution, now known to be a forgery; named after Piltdown Common in Sussex where the pieces of Piltdown Man's skull were found
if you can spot fifty I spy four more: Wiki: fifty-four → 54 = LIV in Roman numerals → ALP or Anna LIVia Plurabelle. Also ‘I spy with my little eye something beginning with’ (childrens game) liv: (Danish) life. River Liffey, of which ALP is a personification
a runalittle, doalittle, preealittle, pouralittle: Wiki: one, two, three, four... Rune: norse letter → the letter the hen gnarlybird gathers ygathering from the dump. run a little. The idea is partly that a letter is found ( by who?) that has some incriminating evidence on HCE’s ‘crime’. Wiki has it as ALP’s letter, which the hen digs up from the rubbish tip (whats in the letter?)
Twelve ‘littles’ : twelves – the 12 jury men? Twelve mourners etc?
Under his seven wrothschields lies one : Rothschild: fabulously wealthy and prominent German-Jewish banking family → Lord Byron is alleged to have said that Napoleon was defeated not by Wellington but by the House of Rothschild. Under 7 lies one??
Lumproar: l’empereur: (French) the emperor, i.e. Napoleon, here identified with HCE. lump → HCE's fat belly sticking up beneath the quilt as he lies in bed
The three of crows: not sure what their significance is. Comes up later in the book? FW WIKI The Three Ravens → Downadown, High Downadown
The three of crows have flapped it southenly, kraaking of debaccle to the kvarters of that sky: The three crows fly away,debacle, quarters of the sky. ¾ meaning?

She niver comes out when Thon’s on shower or when Thon’s flash with his Nixy girls or when Thon’s blowing toom-cracks down the gaels of Thon: Not sure about this. Who is Thon? Flash and toom-cracks maybe thunder and lightening. Gaels: Gale or Gael > Irish person. WIKI flash: to expose oneself indecently in public

Neblas on you liv!: never on your life. nebula: (Latin) mist; vapour LIV = ALP and River Liffey
Her would be too moochy afreet: she is too afraid.
Of Burymeleg and Bindme-rollingeyes and all the deed in the woe: Bury my leg, (could be slang for sex?) Leg-over, mind my ‘roving eyes’ - some guy who is always eying up women, mind my roving eyes
all the deed in the woe: Dyed in the wool, meaning extreme or unchanging in attitude, opinion, etc. or complete, totally
Fe fo fom : Fee! Fie! Foe! Fum! → from the English fairy tale Jack and the Beanstalk: Fee! Fie! Foe! Fum! I smell the blood of an Englishman.
She jist does hopes till byes will be byes: boys will be boys: (proverb) one must expect and put up with foolish or childish behaviour.

flower Joseph Campbells take on this section is that the Janitrix in the museum transforms into a bird and moves through the twilight gathering relics (after the battle when its quiet?). Also refers to widowed Isis gathering the fragments of dismembered husband Osiris.

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:56 am

Para 12 pt2
Here, and it goes on to appear now, she comes, a peacefugle, a parody’s bird, a peri potmother, a pringlpik in the ilandiskippy, with peewee and powwows in beggybaggy on her bickybacky and a flick flask fleckflinging its pixylighting pacts’ huemeramybows, picking here, pecking there, pussypussy plunderpussy. But it’s the armitides toonigh, militopucos, and toomourn we wish for a muddy kissmans to the minutia workers and there’s to be a gorgeups truce for happinest childher everwere. Come nebo me and suso sing the day we sallybright. She’s burrowed the coacher’s headlight the better to pry (who goes cute goes siocur and shoos aroun) and all spoiled goods go into her nabsack: curtrages and rattlin buttins, nappy spattees and flasks of all nations, clavicures and scampulars, maps, keys and woodpiles of haypennies and moonled brooches with bloodstaned breeks in em, boaston nightgarters and masses of shoesets and nickelly nacks and foder allmicheal and a lugly parson of cates and howitzer muchears and midgers and maggets, ills and ells with loffs of toffs and pleures of bells and the last sigh that come fro the hart (bucklied!) and the fairest sin the sunsaw (that’s cearc!). With Kiss. Kiss Criss. Cross Criss. Kiss Cross. Undo lives ‘end. Slain.
peacefugle : peace, and also piece ( picking up pieces). Fugue. Bugle. WIKI peace-fowl → bird of peace → dove → Issy
a parody’s bird= paradise bird
a peri potmother: fairygodmother
pringlpik in the ilandiskippy: pinprick, kip: (Dutch) hen in the landscape. Also Island and skip (place where rubbish is put) or skip as a verb
powwows: native american peace meeting
beggybaggy: beggars bag? Small bag from the Irish ‘Beag’ meaning small
bickybacky: pick back? (giving someone a) Piggy back (carry),
flick flask fleckflinging: fast picking/ flinging what she is picking up?
pixylighting pacts’: Pixylighting: pixillating: bewildering, bemusing, enchanting; intoxicating. pixillation: a method of animating human figures or animals by using, for example, stop-frame camera techniques. pixie: a small fairy – she is moving like a pixie? . pax: (Latin) peace (contrast with war episode in the museum).
Huemeramybows: Who are my boys? Over my brows?
pussypussy plunderpussy: pussy – cat, vagina, blunderbuss (gun)
armitides toonigh: armistice tonight (female as peace bringer), my tides tonight (her period?)
militopucos: WIKI milito: (Esperanto) war, paco: (Esperanto) peace [Did esperanto exist in Joyces time??]
gorgeups truce for Happinest Childher Everwere.: there’s a gorgeous truce for the happiest children anywhere. (working class Dubliners sometimes say childer for children). Two images Xmas and the general Truce after the War image of this paragraph. HCE again
Come nebo me and suso sing the day we sallybright: come neighbour me and sing (on) the day we celebrate – Xmas type feel.
She’s burrowed the coacher’s headlight the better to pry (who goes cute goes siocur and shoos aroun) and all spoiled goods go into her nabsack: She’s borrowed a light to see all the spoiled goods (of war?) that will go in her knapsack.
curtrages and rattlin buttins, nappy spattees and flasks of all nations: cutlasses. Buttons, spats (shoe spat?) flags of all nations. Butt: (1) Isaac Butt, Irish parliamentarian who was ousted from the leadership of the Irish Parliamentary Party by Parnell; (2) Butt Bridge in Dublin
clavicures and scampulars,: clivles and scapula ( bones) French: ampoule = am + poule ("hen") = I am a hen
haypennies: halfpenny , small coin. Also the Ha'penny Bridge very famous footbridge over the Liffey
boaston: Apparently the letter which is found ( comes in later chapter) is from Boston.
nickelly nacks and foder allmicheal: nicknacks, father almighty, fodder, WIKI Father Michael: a curate or hermit who seduces ALP (FW 111.13-35) or is seduced by her (FW 203.17 - 204.05); he is probably based on Michael Bodkin (Nora Barnacle's dead lover, who provided the model for Michael Furey in The Dead) and a curate in Galway who supposedly abused Nora Barnacle when she was sixteen. foder: (Portuguese) to fuck. foder: (Danish) fodder; feed
a lugly parson of cates: a lovely parcel of cakes, an ugly parson. ALP
midgers and maggets: midges and maggots
ills and ells: ils: (French) them (masculine) elles: (French) them (feminine)
pleures of bells: Anna Livia Plurabelle
bucklied: Bucly and the Russian General? WIKI buck: a male deer. Lied: (German) song Buckley: a personification of the combined Shem-Shaun character
cearc: Irish for a hen
criss-cross → the lines of ALP’s letter run both horizontally and vertically across the page (FW 114.02-07); this reflects a common practice of Irish peasants in the 19th Century, which was designed to save paper → the criss-crossing of the lines also reflects the flagpatch quilt on HCE and ALP's bed
With Kiss. Kiss Criss. Cross Criss. Kiss Cross: four crosses at the end of a love letter. WIKI criss-cross → the lines of ALP’s letter run both horizontally and vertically across the page (FW 114.02-07); this reflects a common practice of Irish peasants in the 19th Century, which was designed to save paper → the criss-crossing of the lines also reflects the flagpatch quilt on HCE and ALP's bed. The Boston letter is a love letter??
Slain.: someone is slain, or the Irish word slain (pronounced slaw-in) meaning goodbye

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:59 am

Para 13
How bootifull and how truetowife of her, when strengly fore-bidden, to steal our historic presents from the past postpropheti — cals so as to will make us all lordy heirs and ladymaidesses of a pretty nice kettle of fruit. She is livving in our midst of debt and laffing through all plores for us (her birth is uncontrollable), with a naperon for her mask and her sabboes kickin arias (so sair! so solly!) if yous ask me and I saack you. Hou! Hou! Gricks may rise and Troysirs fall (there being two sights for ever a picture) for in the byways of high improvidence that’s what makes life-work leaving and the world’s a cell for citters to cit in. Let young wimman run away with the story and let young min talk smooth behind the butteler’s back. She knows her knight’s duty while Luntum sleeps. Did ye save any tin? says he. Did I what? with a grin says she. And we all like a marriedann because she is mer-cenary. Though the length of the land lies under liquidation (floote!) and there’s nare a hairbrow nor an eyebush on this glau-brous phace of Herrschuft Whatarwelter she’ll loan a vesta and hire some peat and sarch the shores her cockles to heat and she’ll do all a turfwoman can to piff the business on. Paff. To puff the blaziness on. Poffpoff. And even if Humpty shell fall frumpty times as awkward again in the beardsboosoloom of all our grand remonstrancers there’ll be iggs for the brekkers come to mourn-him, sunny side up with care. So true is it that therewhere’s a turnover the tay is wet too and when you think you ketch sight of a hind make sure but you’re cocked by a hin.

Bootifull: booty, beautiful
Livving: Liffey, ALP
all plores for us: ALP. WIKI pluere: (Latin) to flow → the flow of the river Liffey, identified in FW with ALP → and perhaps also ALP's menstrual flow (suggested by uncontrollable birth in the same line) plorare: (Latin) to cry, weep, wail → contrasted with laughing in the same line
so sair!: Sarah in old testament
and I saack you. Hou! Hou!: Wiki : Isaac: Biblical character, the son of Sarah (see sair and solly) and the patriarch Abraham; in Hebrew "Isaac" means "God has laughed" (see Genesis 21:6), which echoes laffing two lines above and anticipates Hou! Hou! in the same line
Gricks may rise and Troysirs fall: Pricks my rise and trousers fall, Greeks and Trojans
there being two sights for ever a picture: 2 sides to every story
makes life-work leaving: makes life worth living
a cell for citters to cit in : WIKI: città: (Italian) city. zittern: (German) to tremble. cit: (archaic slang) a term of contempt for a townsman, not a gentleman. sitters to sit in. sinners to sin in. shitters to shit in → the outhouse
let young min talk smooth behind the butteler’s back: As RAW often remarked, Dublin is a city that thrives on gossip. This line certainly fits. Also. Butt Bridge over the Liffey, butt: arse, behind. talk behind the butler's back: to spread rumours. behind; bottom, butt, arse
She knows her knight’s duty while Luntum sleeps: Her nights duty –wife’s duty to have sex with her husband (HCE and ALP) (sex as a duty!!!), While London Sleeps: (1) a music-hall song from the 19th Century (2) a movie about a dog who rescues a young woman from an "ape-man" who is terrorizing London (1926)> Could also be 'While Dublin sleeps'.
And we all like a marriedann because she is mer-cenary: marriedann> harridan: a sharp-tongued, scolding or bullying old woman, married Anne → Anna Livia Plurabelle, does it for gain/ profit?

Though the length of the land lies under liquidation (floote!) and there’s nare a hairbrow nor an eyebush on this glau-brous phace of Herrschuft Whatarwelter: Images of the Flood via German and Norse. Liquidation/ floote> flood. WIKI: Der Herr schuf die Welt: (German) The Lord created the world. Herrschaft: (German) mastery, Schuft: (German) scoundrel, rogue, waterworld → continuing the allusions to the Flood, welter: the rolling of waves. hairbrush nor an eyebrow
hair ... eyebrows: in Nordic mythology, after the Universal Flood Ymir’s body became the world, his hair became the trees, and his eyebrows became the grass and flowers. Does this also refer to Finnegan’s body being part of the landscape?
she’ll loan a vesta and hire some peat and sarch the shores her cockles to heat and she’ll do all a turfwoman can to piff the business on: two images in this section> one is the flood and the other is the woman (ALP?) lighting a fire/eternal fire: vesta: a match, Vesta: Roman goddess of the hearth, celebrated with an eternal flame → hence the word vesta, meaning "match", and vestal virgins, who tended the eternal flame → introduces images of a woman tending a fire with a bellows.
Piff Paff Onomataopeiac sounds like tip tap earlier
To puff the blaziness on: starting the fire
And even if Humpty shell fall frumpty times as awkward again in the beardsboosoloom of all our grand remonstrancers there’ll be iggs for the brekkers come to mourn-him, sunny side up with care: back to the idea of Finnegans body as feast for the mourners, meal prepared by the woman ( ALP?), also Humpty Dumpty fall image, The Grand Remonstrance: WIKI> a statement of abuses giving an account of royal mismanagement and recommending radical reforms; it was produced by Parliament and presented to Charles I in 1641, monstrance: an ornamental receptacle in which the consecrated host is exposed in Catholic churches
So true is it that therewhere’s a turnover the tay is wet too and when you think you ketch sight of a hind make sure but you’re cocked by a hin: mixture of food and sexual imagery. Hind, wet, turnover and cocked, then also The tea is wet (Irish expression the tea is ready).

tony smyth

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Re: PART ONE: Chapter One

Post  tony smyth on Sat Apr 06, 2013 10:55 am

Para 14
Then as she is on her behaviourite job of quainance bandy, fruting for firstlings and taking her tithe, we may take our review of the two mounds to see nothing of the himples here as at else-where, by sixes and sevens, like so many heegills and collines, sitton aroont, scentbreeched ant somepotreek, in their swisha-wish satins and their taffetaffe tights, playing Wharton’s Folly, at a treepurty on the planko in the purk. Stand up, mickos! Make strake for minnas! By order, Nicholas Proud. We may see and hear nothing if we choose of the shortlegged bergins off Corkhill or the bergamoors of Arbourhill or the bergagambols of Summerhill or the bergincellies of Miseryhill or the country-bossed bergones of Constitutionhill though every crowd has its several tones and every trade has its clever mechanics and each harmonical has a point of its own, Olaf’s on the rise and Ivor’s on the lift and Sitric’s place’s between them. But all they are all there scraping along to sneeze out a likelihood that will solve and salve life’s robulous rebus, hopping round his middle like kippers on a griddle, O, as he lays dormont from the macroborg of Holdhard to the microbirg of Pied de Poudre. Behove this sound of Irish sense. Really? Here English might be seen. Royally? One sovereign punned to petery pence. Regally? The silence speaks the scene. Fake!
So This Is Dyoublong?
Hush! Caution! Echoland!

This section seems to be set in Phoenix Park and has musical overtones (as it were) and also references to hills, and Gullivers Travels.
Behaviourite job of quainance bandy: favourite/ behaviour of bandying with acquaintances. WIKI: On the job > slang for having sex. Queen Anne’s Bounty: a fund to provide for the maintenance of poor clergymen in the church of England; it was created in 1703 out of first fruits and tenths (hence the following allusions the Hen fruting for firstlings and taking her tithe) . Queen Anne: Queen of England and Ireland 1702-1714, when Jonathan Swift was in London, unsuccessfully urging upon the Whig administration of Lord Godolphin the claims of the Irish clergy to the First-Fruits and Twentieths ("Queen Anne's Bounty"), which brought in about £2,500 a year, already granted to their brethren in England. band: orchestra → there is a musical foliation in this paragraph → military band, which is providing the music during a Military Review in the Phoenix Park. bander: (French) to have an erection
fruting for firstlings and taking her tithe: tithe: a tenth part, especially the tenth of the produce of land and stock paid as a tax to the Church; first fruit
The two mounds to see nothing of the himples here as at else-where: Could be either, HCEs arse, the shape of HCE and ALP lying side by side, or my choice, the shape of Howth Head and Chapelizod where the giants feet are (and Phoenix Park in the middle), OR WIKI nipples → beneath visible areas of the breasts, they are hidden by the clothing ("we may take our review of the two mounds to see nothing of the himples") → preceding references to women's clothing ("in their swishawish satins and their taffetaffe tights"), this and the words "two mounds" seems to refer to two breasts and nipples. OR it could be ALL OF THEM at once!!

heegills and collines: Hügel: (German) hill, or HE ( male), Colleen (irish word for girl) and coline (French for hill).
scentbreeched ant somepotreek: Scent and breeches, Saint Patrick brought Xtianity to Ireland. Croagh Patrick mountain in Mayo in the West of Ireland where Catholic pilgrims climb (often in bare feet) on one fortuitous day. It is nicknamed the Reek - smoking pot on the Reek, not a bad idea if good weather. Its said on the rare good day (often rains in the west of I) you can see 365 islands in Clew Bay nearby
swisha-wish satins: More clothes> WIKI: ALP and Issy are often associated with things Swiss → land of the Alps for ALP → Issy's room is at the top of the house under the pitched roof, as though she lives high up in the mountains
Taffetaffe tights: German tauftauf – to baptise ( mentioned earlier)
playing Wharton’s Folly: playing music, also Wharton’s Folly: nickname of an unfinished fortress in the Phoenix Park
a treepurty on the planko in the purk: Are HCE and family having a tea party with music in the background in Phoenix Park? WIKI: planco: (Esperanto) ground
Stand up, mickos! Make strake for minnas!: Mickey and Minnie (had to check if that exsisted in Joyces day). Sexual meaning - get erection. WIKI: Move over, Mick, make room for Dick: anonymous Dublin doggerel which was quoted in the Illustrated Sunday Herald on 26 Nevember 1922, shortly after the death of Michael Collins in the Irish Civil War, referring to Collins [Mick] and his successor as leader of the Free State forces Richard Mulcahy [Dick]
hear nothing if we choose of the shortlegged bergins off Corkhill or the bergamoors of Arbourhill or the bergagambols of Summerhill or the bergincellies of Miseryhill or the country-bossed bergones of Constitutionhill: Musical references and also to streets in Dublin. > viola d’amore: a stringed instrument → L/R split → the second member of a chest of viols, viola da gamba: stringed instrument → the third member of a chest of viols, violoncello: stringed instrument → the fourth member of a chest of viols, contrabass: (music) a double-bass
every crowd has its several tones and every trade has its clever mechanics and each harmonical has a point of its own: Tone, harmonic. ECH = HCE
Olaf’s on the rise and Ivor’s on the lift and Sitric’s place’s between them: This paragraph has quite a few left to right references. Aulaf, Sitric and Ivar: the three Norse brothers who founded Dublin, Waterford and Limerick → also Shem, Shaun and the combined Shem-Shaun character. Dublin founded by the Vikings.
life’s robulous rebus: Romulus and Remus, founders of Rome
Hopping round his middle like kippers on a griddle, O: another reference to the song Phil the Fluters Ball
Dormont: Dormant, mont: (French) mountain → HCE, who is frequently identified throughout FW with hills and mountains, reminder that the whole book is occurring during sleep
Berg: (German) mountain → Castleknock Hill & Windmill Hill, or Castleknock Hill & Knockmaroon Hill, which represent the two feet of HCE interred in the Dublin landscape
from the macroborg of Holdhard to the microbirg of Pied de Poudre.: more reference to hills both big and small, pied – feet in French. WIKI > pied de poudre: (French) foot of dust → poudre: (French) gunpowder → the Magazine Fort in the Phoenix Park

Behove this sound of Irish sense.: Gulliver’s Travels, ( giant tied down by little people, asleep) and Jonathan Swift. Behold a proof of Irish sense! from Jonathan Swift's Epigram on the Magazine satirizing the building of the Magazine fort in the Phoenix Park: “Behold a proof of Irish sense! Here Irish wit is seen! Where nothing’s left that’s worth defence, they build a magazine.”
One sovereign punned to petery pence: sovereign: from 1817-1914, a pound coin in “old money”, sovereign: royal. English King nominally king of Ireland. pound: the former unit of currency in Ireland; in "old money" (i.e. before 1971, when decimalisation was introduced), one pound (£1) was equivalent to 240 pence (240d) Peter’s Pence: (1) an annual tax or tribute of a silver penny from each householder having land of a certain value, paid before the Reformation to the Papal See at Rome; (2) any donation to the Catholic Church
So This Is Dyoublong? So this is Dublin?
Hush! Caution! Echoland!: HCE, also alludes to silence and gossip in Dublin?

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